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Monday's Link Attack: Anthony Kim, North Korea, Korean Sex Scandal

What they said: Anthony Kim
PGATour.com

Here’s a Q&A with pro golfer Anthony Kim, who finished tied for 5th place at the British Open yesterday.

Q. Are you just frustrated or angry or what’s the emotion that is kind of prevalent?

ANTHONY KIM: I wouldn’t say angry. I’m in a pretty good spot in my life I’d say. I would just say I’m frustrated, extremely frustrated with how I was playing and the work I felt like I was putting in. I felt like I wasn’t getting anything out of it. So to put myself in contention on Saturday is a very nice feeling.

North Korea Starving, But Elite Open Luxury Restaurant
ABC News

Earlier this week, “The Restaurant at Hana” opened its doors in the North Korea capital. Restaurants come and go with little fanfare in most world capitals, but it get noticed when one opens in the so-called Hermit Kingdom where famine is threatening to return to the country.

Life of horror in gulags of North Korea
New Zealand Herald

“A day before the executions, prison guards would put huge banners to tell everyone what was going to happen, and on the day everyone would be ordered to attend,” the diminutive 50-year-old explains.

“They would take the prisoner to a stake, tie them up and blindfold them. The firing squad would let off 30 or 40 shots until the prisoner’s body had turned to honeycomb. Every time the bullets hit, the stake would crack backwards.”

Who Killed Kim Sah Nae?
The New Yorker

For years, I pondered the strange fate of Kim Sah Nae, a North Korean diplomat killed mysteriously in her home in Islamabad, Pakistan, more than a decade ago. The facts seemed to have been lifted from a spy movie, with hints of espionage, nuclear secrets, and assassination. Officially, Kim died in an accident, when a neighbor’s cook was loading a shotgun, and it went off. I always figured she’d been murdered. Back then, I even toyed with the idea of writing a screenplay, with Gong Li, I imagined, in the starring role.

Debbie Lee’s Poutine Truck Hits the Streets
L.A. Weekly

Chef Debbie Lee must like running the Ahn-Joo food truck because she’s launching another truck, only this one is Canadian not Korean. Along with partner James MacKinnon, the Food Network regular will debut The Poutine Truck (@thepoutinetruck) this weekend at the Little Tokyo Design Festival.

Korean DJ is Seoul’s master of Western rock
Los Angeles Times

For years, Kang [Hyung-Min] approached foreigners to plumb their musical knowledge. Now the student knows more than his teachers, and he’s sought out by expatriates here for the breadth, style and playfulness of his musical acumen.

Kang spins it all: indie, country, punk. But his specialty is the British sound of the 1980s: the likes of Spandau Ballet, Duran Duran, the Cure and the Smiths.

Former G.I., South Korean girl he befriended, reunite after nearly four decades
The News Journal (Wilmington, Del.)

Insooni, the famous biracial singer from Korea reunited with a former U.S. soldier she met in 1972.

Lewis was a 19-year-old GI when he saw 15-year-old Insoon, the daughter of a Korean mom and an American soldier who was black. Insoon was kicked out of school for being a mixed-race child. Lewis is now 58 and Insooni is 54.

“She was always sitting outside by herself,” Lewis said. “So a few of the soldiers bought her clothes and helped her as much as we could.”

But Insooni only remembers Lewis, whom she considers a big brother.

“I never forgot his eyes,” Insooni said.

Consulting firm offers tips on U.S. university admission
The Korea Herald

As more South Korean students try to get into top American colleges, they have started to turn to admission consulting companies which provide application assistance and help design extracurricular activities.

A team of experts from Manhattan Global Prep, a New York-based college admission consulting firm, offered advice to Korean students in its seminar last Saturday in Seoul on what students should know about the U.S. college admission process and what the company can offer.

The consulting fee ranges from $10,000 to $40,000, depending on a student’s grades, but guarantees acceptance to at least one school for each applicant and pledges a full refund if he or she is not accepted.

Yuliana Kim-Grant’s new novel, ‘A Shred of Hope,’ released
Korean Beacon

Korean American author Yuliana Kim-Grant‘s new release, A Shred of Hope, starts with the sudden death of an interracial couple—the main character, Jane Park, is Korean American, and her husband is African American. The tragic story unfolds and ensues as we gradually learn about Jane’s broken relationship with her parents. Jane’s Korean parents, who had rejected the idea of their daughter marrying an African American man, had cut ties with her after the couple’s wedding—a wedding they did not even attend. But when the couple one day falls victim to a psychopathic gunman in the subway, the parents must go through a grieving process that is marked not only with loss, but also the guilt and regret over a relationship that can no longer be healed.

Sex scandal rumors fly at Korean Assembly
Korea Herald via AsiaOne

The National Assembly was recently shaken by a series of sex scandals, most of them involving members of the Grand National Party.

Earlier this month, a major daily newspaper reported that a married ruling party lawmaker sexually harassed a drunken woman in a taxi and handed over money to the driver who threatened to upload the recorded file on the Internet.

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  • Disenchant

    “Consulting firm”-you know, “being creative” about extracurriculars is essentially lying?. 2nd, I’ve come across many Korean Americans, the ones who grew up in this country, who are alumni from the likes of Harvard, Cal Berkeley, UCLA, U Chicago, U Penn, and the likes and they aren’t in some high and mighty places because of the schools they attended. Yes, it helps, but it’s definitely not a sure shot like many Koreans in the “old country” presume. This “ultra competitiveness” character of Korean culture is not really beneficial.

    Surprise surprise, but the whiteboy or Jewish kid who has connections and is well-spoken will fare better than you in corporate America. Hell yeah, even if he went to some “lower tiered university,” has a lower GPA, and isn’t as good at math as your typical Korean.

  • jstele

    Disenchant,

    Keep making up stories all you want. Perhaps KA’s don’t have all the white connections that Jews or other whites do, but many are certainly well spoken. Asians work hard for their success. You should, too. Obviously, your “connections” haven’t gotten you so far or else you wouldn’t be so bitter.

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