Tag Archives: Anthony Kim

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One-time Golf Rising Star Anthony Kim May Lose Millions If He Returns to the PGA Tour

by JULIE HA

It’s been a lingering question on many golf fans’ minds for years: What ever happened to Anthony Kim?

Sports Illustrated writer Alan Shipnuck, in a recent story for Golf.com, may just have the answer.

But, first, a little history for those who don’t remember Kim, now 29, who hasn’t been seen or heard from on the PGA since 2012.

The one-time rising golf superstar, whom many considered the “next Tiger Woods,” got off to a strong start in his professional career, after earning his PGA Tour card in 2007 and going on to four top-10 finishes during that rookie season. By the following year, the Korean American would win two PGA Tour tournaments, including the Wachovia Championship where he defeated former British Open champion Ben Curtis—and set a tournament record with the lowest score in history, at 16-under par 272 total.

His explosive performance at the Ryder Cup in September of 2008 — Paul Azinger admiringly called his fiercely competitive spirit “infectious” — was considered critical to the U.S.’ victory. The PGA thought it had a star in the making. Not only did Kim seem to ooze the talent — he set a record for the most birdies in a round at the 2009 Master Tournament in Augusta, Ga., with 11 — but he also carried an unabashed swagger about him that the media loved to write about. Some golf commentators said Kim was the type of character that may just add some spice to the sport, in much the same way Tiger Woods did.

Of course, the flip side was that the same commentators also speculated that Kim’s legendary partying off the course could derail his young career. As those rumors were swirling, Kim also began suffering injury after injury — first in 2010 to this left thumb, then his left wrist and later, in 2012, his Achilles tendon in his left leg. Surgery to treat the tendon in the summer of 2012 was said to force his absence from play for up to a year. But after a year, still no Anthony Kim, and earlier this spring, the Golf Channel reported he no longer even played recreational golf. Meanwhile, his agency IMG’s official line was that Kim was injured, but was still hoping to return one day.

And the golf world continued to wonder and speculate: Where is Anthony Kim? And why isn’t he playing golf — at all?

Then, last Friday, Shipnuck’s Golf.com story finally seemed to provide an explanation for why a golfer of this much promise and raw talent would suddenly disappear from the scene. Shipnuck first called IMG’s official line into question, citing an unidentified close friend of Kim’s in Dallas, who said “AK’s not injured. ”

“His swing looks good, the strike sounds solid, his ball flight is good,” the friend told Shipnuck.

The Sports Illustrated writer goes on to explain that what may be standing in the way of Kim ever picking up a golf club competitively again is a hefty insurance policy against career-ending injury that’s worth close to $20 million, tax-free. Shipnuck, in an interview with Boston’s NPR news station WBUR, explained that many golfers have such private policies because, unlike in other sports, there is no long-term guaranteed contract for X amount of dollars.

“You know, in golf, you have to kill what you eat,” Shipnuck told NPR. “Kim had the foresight or the good advice to take out a big one. You know, I’m pretty sure the number’s $18 million, tax free. It sets up this dilemma because if he comes back and plays on the PGA Tour, the policy is voided. Does he take the money and retire in his 20s and then spend the rest of his life in regret of what might have been? Or does he come back and try to be the player he was, fail miserably and leave all that money on the table? On the other hand, if he can come back and play at the level that he did, he can make $18 million in a few years.”

The sports writer said he believes Kim may have a “complicated relationship” with golf, in part, because of great pressure his immigrant father reportedly put on him. When asked if Kim will ever return to the Tour, Shipnuck answered that he’d personally love to see him do so. “It would be a huge story,” he told NPR. “And the back story, you know: ‘This guy gave up $18 million to chase the dream.’ I think sports fans would respond to that.”

But as dramatic a narrative as that sounds, only one person can write the next chapter of the Anthony Kim story.

Featured photo via Getty

Wednesday's Link Attack: Roy Choi, Margaret Cho, Anthony Kim

Roy Choi to open Sunny Spot next week
Los Angeles Times

Roy Choi of Kogi, Chego and A-Frame says he’ll be opening new restaurant Sunny Spot on Nov. 18 in Venice in the former Beechwood space — “think roadside cookshop, where every day’s a holiday.”

Inspired by the cuisine of the West Indies, Sunny Spot’s menu runs the gamut from double-fried jerk chicken and rum-glazed prawns to slow-roasted whole goat and papaya-guava honey pot salad with crushed cashews, red onion, lime and tarragon (pictured).

N.Korean Elite Sniper Defects
Chosun Ilbo

An ex-member of an elite North Korean special warfare unit defected across the West Sea on Oct. 30. He crossed the sea on a raft made of tires, it emerged on Tuesday.

Under questioning by the National Intelligence Service, the military and police, the man, who is in his early 30s, said he had been discharged from the marine sniper brigade five years ago and then worked as a civilian member in a military unit.

Watch Margaret Cho Invade Bonnaroo, Accost Indie Rockers
Spin.com

Last week, we watched Das Racist drag their parents to Bumbershoot. Today, to herald the release of Margaret Cho’s stand-up concert film, Cho Dependent — and say farewell to SPIN’s first-ever “Funny” Issue — we have footage of the comic and friend-of-indie-rockers everywhere bugging the shit out of everyone backstage at the 2010 Bonnaroo festival to the sounds of her “Baby I’m With the Band” (featuring Brendan Benson). Watch carefully to see who embraces the Cho, and who eyes her warily (the list of guest stars includes Conan O’Brien, Reggie Watts, Doug Benson, The Flaming Lips, Weezer, OK Go, the Gossip, The Punch Brothers, and GWAR).

Hines Ward: ‘It’s about the team’
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Hines Ward did not start in Cincinnati, and he played a limited number of snaps in the Steelers’ 24-17 win over the Bengals. If the Steelers’ all-time leading receiver has been demoted he is taking it in stride.

“It’s not about me, it’s about the team,” Ward said. “We won the game that’s the bottom line.”

Ward said his health wasn’t an issue, and that the coaches didn’t tell him before the Bengals game that his playing time would be diminished.

North Korea’s unusual experiment in tourism [SLIDESHOW]
Washington Post

The normally closed, secretive country is trying to open its doors a crack to foreign tourists, particularly from China, as a way of earning hard currency.

[In the photo above,] Chinese tourists converge on the house where the late Kim Il Sung, North Korea’s “Great Leader,” was said to be born.

Anthony Kim – The future’s bright
Sky Sports

Anthony Kim has endured plenty of lows over the past 12 months, but feels he’s now on course to hit new highs.

The Language of Many: ‘The Language Archive’ at East West Players [REVIEW]
Hyphen

During the LA premiere of The Language Archive at East West Players, the scent of warm bread wafted through the theater. There’s nuance to smells, I’m told, a layering that is discernible to even the most indiscriminate noses. The same could be said of language and of theatrical plays that go beyond just the black and white categorization of “good” and “bad.”

As with my nose, there’s a certain level of layering that I’m oblivious and, like the bread smell, there was something comfortable and familiar with the The Language Archive. I spent the evening trying to figure out where I’ve seen this story before.

Sarah Cho of Torrey Pines wins CIF state girls golf title
ESPN.com

Sarah Cho of Torrey Pines won the CIF state girls golf championship in a two-hole playoff over Cha Cha Wilhoite of Palm Desert at the Poppy Hills Golf Course at Pebble Beach on Tuesday.

Cho and Wilhoite were the only two golfers to shoot under par in the tournament. Both were 1-under, 71, after 18 holes.

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S. Korean football fans demand coach’s ouster
AFP via Google News

Angry fans called Wednesday for the resignation of coach Cho Kwang-Rae after South Korea suffered a stunning 1-2 defeat to underdogs Lebanon in the third round of regional World Cup qualification.

The official website of the Korea Football Association (KFA) was flooded with critical postings, with one suggesting a petition campaign to press the KFA to dismiss Cho.

Newspapers also lambasted South Korea for playing what Chosun Ilbo daily called a “game of sleepwalkers”.

Asian women struggle to make films
City Times (San Diego)

For many filmmakers, the festival serves as an opportunity to create change in the industry through gaining exposure and connecting with people.

“Support from groups like this has been invaluable in helping further my career,” said Mina T. Son, a Korean American filmmaker who screened her short, “Making Noise in Silence,” at the festival. The the short follows the lives of two Korean-American students at the California School for the Deaf. Son returned to the festival to receive an award for Best Short Documentary for the second year in a row.

Derek Kirk Kim Completes Season 1 of ‘Mythomania’ Live-Action Web Series [Video]
Comics Alliance

The Eisner and Harvey-winning cartoonist behind such works as Same Difference and Other Stories, The Eternal Smile (with Gene Luen Yang) and Good As Lily (with Jesse Hamm), Derek Kirk Kim has completed the first season of his live-action Web series Mythomania. Written and directed by Kim, the show follows aspiring cartoonist Andy Go as he navigates the joys, challenges, sacrifices, screw-overs and other assorted indignities suffered by those who seek their fortunes in the comic book book business. The show is an honest and personal (perhaps too personal, in the case of episode seven) into what life can be like for cartoonists, and how easy it can be to face not only rejection but also opportunity.

Serial Smacker Hits Seoul’s New Mayor
Wall Street Journal

There’s a new addition to the diverse and colorful ranks of South Korean protesters: a woman who is a serial head-smacker.

The 62-year-old woman has only been publicly identified by her last name, Park. She has been going around for the past few months hitting left-wing politicians on the head.

On Tuesday, she walked into an event in a subway station where Seoul’s new mayor, Park Won-soon, was speaking, got right up behind him, then hit him on the head and called him a “communist.”

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KJ Choi Pulls Ahead Of Anthony Kim To Win Own Tournament

KJ Choi came back from three strokes behind heading into the final round to win the inaugural CJ Invitational in Yeoju, South Korea by two strokes on Sunday.

The Korean-born golfer, sitting in third place after Saturday’s round behind surprise leader Lee Ki-Sang and Korean American Anthony Kim, shot a five-under-par 67 in the final round, according to AFP.

Choi, 41, “wowed the crowd” with three birdies on the homeward nine in front of large galleries at the Haesley Nine Bridges Golf Club in Yeoju, a city located about 65 miles south of Seoul.

It was Choi’s second victory of the season following his triumph in the Players Championship in the United States and his fifth career title on the Asian Tour, where he is an honorary member.

“This week I had so many things going on. I didn’t really think about the win. I was busy looking after the players and taking care of the sponsors,” said Choi.

“Probably the fact that I wasn’t thinking about the tournament helped me feel at ease. The way it turned out, I’m happy to be the inaugural champion and even though I am hosting this event, it gives a special meaning,” said Choi, who totalled 17-under-par 271 and pocketed $118,875.

Meanwhile, fellow countryman Noh Seung-Yul, ranked no. 1 on the Asian Tour, finished in second place. Kim and Saturday’s leader Lee closed in a tie for third place.

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Friday's Link Attack: Anthony Kim, Dr. Sammy Lee

American Kim leads by a hair in S. Korea
AP via Google News

Anthony Kim may soon require a trip to the hairdresser after he battled his way to a six-under-par 66 on Friday to propel him into a three-shot halfway lead at the inaugural CJ Invitational.

The 26-year-old American, a three-time winner in the United States, did not even produce his best golf at the Haesley Nine Bridges Golf Club but ground out seven birdies in the $750,000 event in South Korea hosted by K.J. Choi.

Choi endured an error-strewn 70 for tied second place with fellow South Koreans Lee Ki-Sang and David Oh, who shot 67 and 69 respectively for a 137 total in the co-sanctioned Asian Tour and Korean Golf Tour showpiece.

Oral history? Telling it like it was
Orange County Register

Dr. Sammy Lee has a tale to tell.

Born in California in 1920, he was inspired by the 1932 LA Olympics to become a two-time Olympic gold diving champion. A respected doctor and veteran, he traveled the world and was family friends with Syngman Rhee, the first president of South Korea.

The son of immigrants, he encountered discrimination that sounds horse and buggy today – outmoded from a different time.

Lee could not practice diving at private clubs because these pools were closed to Asians. During World War II, he once wore a badge: “I am Korean, not a Jap.” He won the 1953 Sullivan Award from the Amateur Athletic Union, but was turned down twice in 1954 trying to buy a house in all-white Garden Grove — until the media got involved.

Those are the facts, an outline for a story only Lee can tell. It’s the kind of the story the Center for Oral and Public History at Cal State Fullerton wants to capture.

Palisades Park woman admits role in ID-theft and bank-fraud ring
Bergen County Record (N.J.)

A Palisades Park woman who was one of 53 suspects arrested in a massive identity-theft and bank-fraud ring last year pleaded guilty Thursday to conspiracy to produce phony identification documents, U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman said.

Sung-Sil Joh, 47, also pleaded guilty in federal court in Newark to charges of conspiracy to commit wire fraud affecting financial institutions, bank fraud and aggravated identity theft, authorities said.

Joh was arrested in September 2010 when authorities broke up an identity-theft and bank-fraud ring allegedly run by Sang-Hyun “Jimmy” Park, 44, of Palisades Park.

The ring allegedly obtained Social Security cards beginning with “586.” Cards with that prefix were issued legitimately in the 1990s to Chinese citizens who came to work in American territories such as American Samoa, Guam and Saipan.

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US citizen killed in Medan
Jakarta Post (Indonesia)

US citizen Samuel Hyein, 28, died after he was stabbed by two unidentified men riding on a motorcycle.

The Korean-American was taking a pedicab headed to his hotel from Polonia International Airport, according to North Sumatra Police chief Sr. Comr. Heru Prakoso.

“The victim had just arrived at 10:30 p.m. local time from Malaysia on an AirAsia flight,” Heru said on Thursday.

Hyein bled to death from a wound to his leg while being treated at Elisabeth Hospital in Medan.

“We are still trying to identify the perpetrators. Their features were obscured since they wore helmets,” Heru said.

Detectives were still searching for a motive, Heru said. All of Hyein’s property was accounted for, mooting assumptions that the killing was a botched robbery.

From Korean orphan to Richmond local hero
Richmond Times-Dispatch (Virginia)

Margaret Lerke Woody, whose abandonment as a Korean infant severed her ancestral bloodlines, has become a vital Richmond community lifeline as a volunteer, caregiver and champion of inclusion.

For her efforts, Woody was honored as a “local hero” during Thursday night’s Neighborhood Excellence Initiative Awards at the Virginia Historical Society. With her recognition comes a $5,000 gift from Bank of America to ART 180, an organization that seeks to transform local youth and communities through art.

Marina woman says she was imprisoned in chicken coop
Monterey County-Herald (Calif.)

A Korean woman in California locked up her Japanese mother-in-law in a chicken coop.

A 92-year-old woman reported to the Marina Police Department she was battered and locked in a chicken coop Wednesday by her daughter-in-law.

The alleged victim said Myuong Sakasegawa, 64, took her purse, battered her, and locked her in the chicken coop. She said she was released from the coop by her son about an hour later.

(HT Marmot’s Hole)

Manoa school featured in George Clooney movie
KHON2.com (Honolulu, HI)

The upcoming film “The Descendants,” starring George Clooney and directed by Alexander Payne was shot entirely in Hawaii and hundreds of local students auditioned for small parts in the movie. One of them was high school student Esther Kang, who had a scene with the Academy Award-winning actor.

“He was like making jokes, he was a super cool guy, like, I had a conversation with him. It was sweet just to meet him,” said Esther Kang. “When I found out [I was cast] I was so happy it was like the best day of my life.”

Adoption satire mostly hits mark
Minneapolis Star Tribune

In “Four Destinies,” Korean-American playwright Katie Hae Leo’s smart, cutting social satire now up in a premiere in Minneapolis, a meddlesome character named Katie Leo (played by Katie Bradley) declares that she wants to speak for all adoptees. And she does, with tongue firmly planted in cheek.

Beckman’s Kim runs over Northwood for five TDs
OCVarsity

It turns out last week was just a warmup for Jeff Kim.

After rushing for 191 yards and two touchdowns last week against Woodbridge, Kim ran for 253 yards and five touchdowns Thursday in visiting Beckman’s 52-31 victory over Northwood in a Pacific Coast League game at Irvine High.

Kim, who was not allowed to play in three games because of undisclosed reasons and returned to action for the Woodbridge game, had 218 yards in the first half and scored four touchdowns in the second quarter.

For the season, Kim, a 5-foot-11, 190-pound senior, has rushed for 621 yards and 10 touchdowns.

Organizers Accused of Sexually Harassing Beauty Queens
Chosun Ilbo

Contestants of an international beauty pageant hosted by Korea were sexually harassed and offered places in the competition in exchange for sex, contestants claim.

Amy Willerton (19), who competed in the 2011 Miss Asia Pacific World in Korea from Oct. 1 to 15, was quoted by the Sun on Wednesday as saying, “I had two of the organisers sexually assault me — one tried to pull my top down.”

“Girls were pulled aside and told they knew what they had to do if they wanted to win — we all knew they meant sex,” Willerton said.

About 50 contestants participated in the pageant, the first of its kind, in Seoul, Daegu and Busan between Oct. 1 and Oct. 15. The top prize was US$20,000.

Contestants were put in a hotel without enough beds and fed just one meal per day, Willerton said. An optional “talent round” was won by Miss Venezuela, who had not even entered that section of the competition.

Latest hot Korean medical tour: Voice feminization surgery
CNNGo

A little over a decade ago, Dr. Kim Hyung-tae, 48, was your standard otolaryngologist, or a doctor specializing in ear, nose and throat.

Now he is being touted as the best in a highly specialized area — voice feminization surgery, which he developed while treating anemic patients at Catholic University Hospital in Seoul.

Initially devised as a way to combat the voice-deepening side effects of treating anemic female patients, voice feminization surgery is becoming increasingly sought after by transsexuals from overseas who fly in to specifically to receive this treatment, reported Joongang Ilbo today.

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Name released of victim in fatal Wednesday crash near Drummond
KBZK.com (Bozeman, Mont.)

Powell County authorities released the name of a man killed in a Wednesday morning crash on I-90 near Deer Lodge as Yun Seok Kang, 41, of Denver, Colorado.

A passenger car with two people hit an elk while traveling westbound in Powell County at around 3 a.m. Wednesday, according to Montana Highway patrol Trooper Tom Gill. Gill said after hitting the elk, the driver lost control of the vehicle, which then crossed the median into the eastbound lanes and hit a semi truck head-on.

Kang was a passenger in the car. The driver, a female, was taken to Deer Lodge by ambulance and then airlifted to a Great Falls hospital.

Student group raises awareness about North Korea
The Pitt News (Univ. of Pittsburgh)

Pitt’s chapter of Liberties in North Korea is a nonprofit student organization designed to break down those walls of silence.

“We raise awareness about not only the human-rights atrocities going on in North Korea, but also the refugee situation in China,” T.J. Collanto, president of Pitt’s Liberty in North Korea chapter, said.

Last year, former Pitt seniors Laura Lee and Jimmy Eppley launched the organization on campus. They devised a way to involve Pitt in the national organization after watching a documentary screening of the crisis in North Korea. Eppley is now a fifth-year senior and Lee has graduated, but the club’s message resonated with the people who joined.

Thursday's Link Attack: Anthony Kim, North Korea, Margaret Cho

Anthony Kim happy to be contending
ESPN.com

Golf beat writer Bob Harig talks to Southern California native Anthony Kim about what he’s done to turn his game around following a surprising 5th-place finish at last week’s British Open.

Once considered among the best of a group of up-and-coming young American players, Kim, 26, has clearly not been the same since undergoing thumb surgery last year following a tie for seventh at the Quail Hollow Championship.

“I’ve found my game, it’s just I haven’t brought it to the tournaments,” Kim said Sunday. “I’m excited that this is the tournament I brought it to. Obviously other tournaments are very important, but to play well at major championships is what I work for. So to be able to put up some good rounds, probably my best rounds I’ve played all year, at the British, is pretty rewarding.”

Why Mayor Kang should run for Congress
Orange County Register

After tearing apart the campaign prospects of [Irvine, Calif.] Mayor Sukhee Kang last week, I thought I would address some of the reasons that might motivate the mayor and perhaps others to support his bid for Congress.

Congress pays better. This might sound like a bad reason to run for Congress. But for Mayor Kang, who treats the part-time job he has now as a full-time gig, he might feel more appreciated collecting a six-figure pay check from the federal government.

Sung Kim vows efforts for denuclearization of N. Korea
Yonhap News

The nominee to become the new U.S. ambassador to South Korea said Thursday that he will play a bridging role between the allies in resolving the North Korean nuclear crisis and preventing the communist nation’s provocations.

Park scores second in consecutive friendly in US
Korea Times

Manchester United midfielder Park Ji-sung netted his second goal in a consecutive pre-season friendly match in the United States, Thursday.

The first Korean English Premier Leaguer notched the team’s fifth goal in its 7-0 triumph against the Seattle Sounders at CenturyLink Field.

Margaret Cho Talks Latest Album ‘Cho Dependent’ And Its Serious Indie Cred (VIDEO)
The Huffington Post

Cho enlisted many top talents from the world of indie music, including Andrew Bird, Jon Brion, Ani DiFranco, Ben Lee and Tegan and Sara to write and perform with her on the album. “Cho Dependent” was nominated for a 2010 Grammy as Best Comedy Album. The result was a very unique sound — Cho may be the only musician who cites both David Bowie and “Weird Al” Yankovic among her primary influences.

APA Spotlight: Tammy Chu, Co-Founder Adoptee Solidarity Korea
8Asians

Tammy Chu was born in Seoul, Korea and adopted to the U.S. She studied Cinema and Photography at Ithaca College. Her award-winning first short documentary, Searching for Go-Hyang, was broadcast on PBS, EBS (Korea), and screened at film festivals internationally.

Tammy has been living in Korea for several years and is a co-founding member of Adoptee Solidarity Korea, an adoptee activist organization based in Seoul.

Half-Korean Pro Basketball Brothers Get Korean Citizenship
Korea Herald

Two half-Korean basketball players playing in Korea’s top division basketball league have acquired Korean citizenship, the Justice Ministry announced on Thursday.

Moon Tae-young and his elder brother Tae-jong, who were born to an American father and a Korean mother, received dual citizenship status in accordance with the revised immigration law, the ministry said.

Kenneth Choi Talks ‘Captain America’ On The Red Carpet

Monday's Link Attack: Anthony Kim, North Korea, Korean Sex Scandal

What they said: Anthony Kim
PGATour.com

Here’s a Q&A with pro golfer Anthony Kim, who finished tied for 5th place at the British Open yesterday.

Q. Are you just frustrated or angry or what’s the emotion that is kind of prevalent?

ANTHONY KIM: I wouldn’t say angry. I’m in a pretty good spot in my life I’d say. I would just say I’m frustrated, extremely frustrated with how I was playing and the work I felt like I was putting in. I felt like I wasn’t getting anything out of it. So to put myself in contention on Saturday is a very nice feeling.

North Korea Starving, But Elite Open Luxury Restaurant
ABC News

Earlier this week, “The Restaurant at Hana” opened its doors in the North Korea capital. Restaurants come and go with little fanfare in most world capitals, but it get noticed when one opens in the so-called Hermit Kingdom where famine is threatening to return to the country.

Life of horror in gulags of North Korea
New Zealand Herald

“A day before the executions, prison guards would put huge banners to tell everyone what was going to happen, and on the day everyone would be ordered to attend,” the diminutive 50-year-old explains.

“They would take the prisoner to a stake, tie them up and blindfold them. The firing squad would let off 30 or 40 shots until the prisoner’s body had turned to honeycomb. Every time the bullets hit, the stake would crack backwards.”

Who Killed Kim Sah Nae?
The New Yorker

For years, I pondered the strange fate of Kim Sah Nae, a North Korean diplomat killed mysteriously in her home in Islamabad, Pakistan, more than a decade ago. The facts seemed to have been lifted from a spy movie, with hints of espionage, nuclear secrets, and assassination. Officially, Kim died in an accident, when a neighbor’s cook was loading a shotgun, and it went off. I always figured she’d been murdered. Back then, I even toyed with the idea of writing a screenplay, with Gong Li, I imagined, in the starring role.

Debbie Lee’s Poutine Truck Hits the Streets
L.A. Weekly

Chef Debbie Lee must like running the Ahn-Joo food truck because she’s launching another truck, only this one is Canadian not Korean. Along with partner James MacKinnon, the Food Network regular will debut The Poutine Truck (@thepoutinetruck) this weekend at the Little Tokyo Design Festival.

Korean DJ is Seoul’s master of Western rock
Los Angeles Times

For years, Kang [Hyung-Min] approached foreigners to plumb their musical knowledge. Now the student knows more than his teachers, and he’s sought out by expatriates here for the breadth, style and playfulness of his musical acumen.

Kang spins it all: indie, country, punk. But his specialty is the British sound of the 1980s: the likes of Spandau Ballet, Duran Duran, the Cure and the Smiths.

Former G.I., South Korean girl he befriended, reunite after nearly four decades
The News Journal (Wilmington, Del.)

Insooni, the famous biracial singer from Korea reunited with a former U.S. soldier she met in 1972.

Lewis was a 19-year-old GI when he saw 15-year-old Insoon, the daughter of a Korean mom and an American soldier who was black. Insoon was kicked out of school for being a mixed-race child. Lewis is now 58 and Insooni is 54.

“She was always sitting outside by herself,” Lewis said. “So a few of the soldiers bought her clothes and helped her as much as we could.”

But Insooni only remembers Lewis, whom she considers a big brother.

“I never forgot his eyes,” Insooni said.

Consulting firm offers tips on U.S. university admission
The Korea Herald

As more South Korean students try to get into top American colleges, they have started to turn to admission consulting companies which provide application assistance and help design extracurricular activities.

A team of experts from Manhattan Global Prep, a New York-based college admission consulting firm, offered advice to Korean students in its seminar last Saturday in Seoul on what students should know about the U.S. college admission process and what the company can offer.

The consulting fee ranges from $10,000 to $40,000, depending on a student’s grades, but guarantees acceptance to at least one school for each applicant and pledges a full refund if he or she is not accepted.

Yuliana Kim-Grant’s new novel, ‘A Shred of Hope,’ released
Korean Beacon

Korean American author Yuliana Kim-Grant‘s new release, A Shred of Hope, starts with the sudden death of an interracial couple—the main character, Jane Park, is Korean American, and her husband is African American. The tragic story unfolds and ensues as we gradually learn about Jane’s broken relationship with her parents. Jane’s Korean parents, who had rejected the idea of their daughter marrying an African American man, had cut ties with her after the couple’s wedding—a wedding they did not even attend. But when the couple one day falls victim to a psychopathic gunman in the subway, the parents must go through a grieving process that is marked not only with loss, but also the guilt and regret over a relationship that can no longer be healed.

Sex scandal rumors fly at Korean Assembly
Korea Herald via AsiaOne

The National Assembly was recently shaken by a series of sex scandals, most of them involving members of the Grand National Party.

Earlier this month, a major daily newspaper reported that a married ruling party lawmaker sexually harassed a drunken woman in a taxi and handed over money to the driver who threatened to upload the recorded file on the Internet.