Tag Archives: daniel henney

BIG HERO 6

Jamie Chung And Daniel Henney Cast In Disney’s ‘Big Hero 6′

by JAMES S. KIM

No strangers to kicking butt, Jamie Chung and Daniel Henney have joined cast of Disney and Marvel’s upcoming animated action-comedy, Big Hero 6, which hits theaters Nov. 7. Directors Don Hall and Chris Williams unveiled the young superhero team yesterday.

Big Hero 6 is set in the fictional San Fransokyo, a metropolis where underground robot fights are all the rage. Hiro Hamada (voiced by Ryan Potter), a 14-year-old robotics prodigy, and his robot Baymax (Scott Adsitt) must join forces with a group of inexperienced crime-fighting “techie heroes” when they uncover a dangerous plot.

BIG HERO 6

Chung voices GoGo Tomago, who is described as a “laconic Clint Eastwood type” who can take care of herself. An industrial engineering student, Go Go developed a bike with magnetic-levitation technology, which also made its way into her super-suit.

Henney voices Tadashi Hamada, the older brother of Hiro, who is heavily involved in the underground bot fights. Tadashi, fortunately, helps inspire Hiro to put his smarts to good use and gain admission to the San Fransokyo Institute of Technology, where he meets a robot named Baymax (voiced by Scott Adsitt). Together, they join forces with the four others to complete the crucial mission.

The team includes Fred (T.J. Miller), a big sci-fi and comic book geek whose “Fredzilla” creature suit is a homage to Godzilla. Honey Lemon (Genesis Rodriguez) is a chemistry student who is a bit geeky, but her sweet personality, positive attitude, and smarts make her a valuable member of the team. Wasabi (Damon Wayans Jr.) sports plasma-induced lasers that come out of his arms, but he’s very cautious about how to go about being a superhero-until he learns to embrace the crazy that comes with the job.

BIG HERO 6

BIG HERO 6

BIG HERO 6

BIG HERO 6

Images via USA Today

hello-kitty-wristphone

Link Attack: LG’s Kid-Tracker, Daniel Henney’s Reality Show & North Korea’s Protest Of ‘The Interview’

What were reading right now.

South Korean electronics companies have found a new market: young kids. LG introduced the KizON, a device that lets parents keep track of where their child is and listen to what they are up to. Swell idea or the beginnings of a dystopian future?

Daniel Henney is part of a new travel reality series on South Korea’s Channel CGV. Maybe he’ll be coming to a town near you.

The third season of “Sullivan And Son” is underway on TBS. Here are some fun facts about its star Steve Byrne.

Where are the Asians in the Asian Republican Coalition? A liberal Korean writer wants to find out.

ESPN profiles the up and down career of Michelle Wie, who is off to a tough start at the British Open.

Though shows such as The O.C. may suggest otherwise, Orange County has the third-largest Asian American population in the nation.

After a disappointing World Cup campaign in Brazil, Hong Myung-bo quits as coach.

The North Korean government has filed a formal protest with the United Nations over The Interview, a film starring Seth Rogen and James Franco about a plot to kill Kim Jong-Un. Seth Rogen seems unfazed.

PHOTO: LG Electronics KizON Hello Kitty wristphone. Courtesy of LG Electronics.

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Why Does Every Blockbuster Have to Kill Off the Asian Guy?

He’s in Every Action Movie–But Not for Long: Meet the Expendable Asian Crewmember

From Godzilla to X-Men to Total Recall, why does every blockbuster need a single Asian guy to kill off?

by PAULA YOUNG LEE

Fans of the original Star Trek television series, which aired from 1966 to 1969, are familiar with the old trope of the expendable Asian crewmember. Every week, one or two unlucky marginal characters, wearing the red shirt of a Security Officer, would join a landing party that usually consisted of Captain James Kirk, First Officer Spock and Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy from the starship USS Enterprise. The trio would beam down to the planet’s surface along with the Expendable Crewmember—who would promptly get killed off by a space monster/mysterious sentient cloud/primitive hostiles. The Expendable Crewmember became such a routine part of the storyline that it was spoofed on the animated television show Family Guy, and became a running joke in the 1999 film Galaxy Quest, in which Sam Rockwell’s character, “Crewman no. 6,” is a nervous wreck named Guy, so forgettable to everyone that even he knows he’s doomed to die.

As little kid, I found it a bit odd that the Klingons always missed Kirk and hit the guy in the red shirt standing next to him. And as I got older, I couldn’t help but notice two strange trends beginning to pop up in Hollywood summer blockbusters: 1) Random storylines would detour to someplace in Asia for no particularly good reason, and 2) One useless Asian character—only one—would show up and stick around just long enough to make a vague impression as a villain. Then he or she would die at the hands of the good (white) guys, who would then march off victoriously into the sunset.

Now, it has been pointed out to me that the business of killing off villains is an equal-opportunity plot device, and Asian people are not being singled out for horrible deaths. Which is true. It’s long been the case that Hollywood casts ethnic minorities as bad guys so their heads can be blasted off. In horror films, there is also the bimbo rule, which requires hot blondes to get killed off first. This is neither racist nor sexist (see no. 7 on this list, John Cho, hot blond), but the norm. The Expendable Asian Crewmember is different from the phenomenon known as the “Asian sidekick,” whose ranks include Cato in the Pink Panther film series from the ’60s and ’70s and remade in 2006; Kato in the Green Hornet television series from the ’60s, remade as a film in 2011; Mr. Miyagi in The Karate Kid, 1984, remade and moved from California to China, 2010; and the mutant Yukio in The Wolverine, 2013. But the vast majority of blockbuster film franchises have no Asian characters in them at all. In general, both New York City and The Future are curiously free of Asians except for Maggie Q, whose time-traveling powers enable her to pop up briefly in Divergent, 2014. There are so few Asians in the galaxy inhabited by Star Wars that a hilarious blog, “You Offend Me You Offend My Family,” has scoured the entire franchise for signs of Asian life. The results were: one rebel officer, and a dubious claim that Admiral Ackbar, fearless cephalopod leader of the Rebellion, was “Asian-like.”

Which brings me to the 2013 Star Trek reboot, with Zoe Saldana as Lt. Uhura and John Cho as Lt. Sulu, plus loads of “Asian-like” aliens, including Vulcans. When the most diverse cast in a Hollywood summer blockbuster happens to be based on a television show that debuted a half century ago, it’s better to be the Expendable (Asian) Crewmember than not be allowed on board at all. But I’m hoping it won’t be another 50 years before Mr. Sulu not only takes the helm, but gets his own ship—and can star in his own film.

Here is a mere sampling of the Expendable Asian Crewmembers I’ve spotted over the years:

X-Men 2: X-Men United, 2003. Yuriko. The perfectly coiffed, impeccably manicured and silent assistant to evil mastermind Stryker, Yuriko turns out to be a super-villain called Lady Deathstrike whose abilities closely parallel those possessed by the Wolverine. Wolverine kills her by injecting her with the rare metal adamantium in its liquid form.

X-Men 3: The Last Stand, 2006. Kid Omega. As the Mutant Brotherhood organizes against humans, Kid Omega becomes one of Magneto’s new recruits. Played by Ken Leung, he can project spikes out all over his body in the manner of an angry porcupine. He dies in a blast of psychokinetic energy unleashed by the super-mutant, Jean Grey/Phoenix.

Mission Impossible III, 2006. Zhen Lei. Played by Maggie Q, this femme fatale joins the “Impossible Mission Force,” experiences a staged death, and disappears from the story. The fact that she is Chinese does not explain why the action relocates to Shanghai as opposed to, say, Southern California, which is also inhabited by white heroes plus a few Chinese people eating noodles.

Live Free or Die Hard2007. Mai Lin. Once again played by Maggie Q, Mai Lin is a cyber-terrorist with nefarious plans that vaguely involve computer hacking. Bruce Willis blames her for the awful script and throws her down an elevator shaft.

The Dark Knight2008. Lau. Played by Chin Han, Lau is a mob accountant who hides the mob’s money and flees to Hong Kong for the express purpose of getting Batman to Asia for an extended tourist commercial involving many tall, sleek skyscrapers. Batman brings Lau back to the U.S., where he is killed by the Joker.

X-Men Origins: Wolverine, 2009. Agent Zero. A mutant expert marksman, Agent Zero, played by ethnic Korean actor Daniel Henney, not only looks fine in a tailored black suit, he has better hair than Wolverine. After many tries, Wolverine finally succeeds in mussing his rival’s hair by downing his helicopter and blowing it up.

John Cho

Total Recall (remake), 2010. Bob McClane. Played by John Cho, better known as Lt. Sulu from the “Star Trek” reboot, Bob gets killed off when he stupidly asks secret agent Doug Quaid about his feelings. This taboo question prompts a police raid that results in everybody except Quaid getting shot.

Pacific Rim, 2013. My friend Minsoo Kang, who is an expert on the history of automatons, told me that not one but “two Chinese robot operators” show up and get crushed when monsters mash their robots. (They die at the same time and don’t have names, so I will count them as one.) Not only does this film have a female lead played by Japanese actress Rinko Kikuchi, but it’s set in Hong Kong, which gets smashed by machine-monsters. This film didn’t do very well in the U.S. but did extremely well in Asia (e.g., China, Korea and Japan). As summed up by Forbes, Pacific Rim was “the rare English-language film in history to cross $400 million while barely crossing $100 million domestic.”

Red 2, 2013. Han Cho-Bai. He is an international assassin sent to kill retired black-ops CIA agent Frank Moses. Moses is played by Bruce Willis, so you know he doesn’t get killed off. Neither does Han Cho-Bai (played by Korean actor Lee Byung-Hun), because he’s a red herring who is really a disguised sidekick. Though I enjoyed the display of his martial arts skills, he’s got no business being in this film except to sell tickets. It made nearly twice as much in foreign receipts as it did in the U.S., and the bulk of those tickets were sold in Japan and South Korea.
 Could there be a theme developing here? Why, yes! And it leads directly to…

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Godzilla (remake), 2014. Dr. Serizawa. Played by the legendary Ken Watanabe, the Serizawa character appears in the 1954 version set in Japan, where he unexpectedly dies. Crucially, the original Godzilla hit U.S. theaters around the same time as the first wave of Asian immigrants, in the aftermath of WWII and the Korean War. Sixty years later, the newer, sexier version of the giant lizard suggests that Godzilla is a strong, charismatic, assimilated Asian-American who wants his own starring role in a summer blockbuster without so much goofy metrosexual makeup. And just as some of the funniest Internet memes focus on the giant lizard’s new Hollywood look, it’s not a done deal that Serizawa’s character gets killed off this time around, even if he is the only Asian character with a name, thus adhering to the one-Asian rule. I guess you could call that progress.

Paula Young Lee’s most recent books are Deer Hunting in Paris: A Memoir of God, Guns, and Game Meat and Game: A Global History, both published in 2013. This article originally appeared in Salon.

 

daniel-henney

Pic of the Day: Daniel Henney Walks His Dog in LA

Daniel Henney—he’s just like us! Only not really at all because seriously, who looks like this while walking their dog? The actor and model was seen strolling through his Hollywood neighborhood with his golden retriever Mango. This month, he graces the cover of Esquire Korea so take a five-minute work break and swoon over those photos, too.   

Photos via Korea Herald

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March Cover Story: Daniel Henney Is Ready For His Hollywood Close-Up

Leading Man

Actor Daniel Henney, who first shot to fame in Korea in the hit drama My Lovely Sam Soon, is now ready for his Hollywood close-up.

story by ADA TSENG
photographs by MITCHELL NGUYEN MCCORMACK/Corbis | styling: JULIET VO grooming: ERICA SAUER @ The Wall Group | stylist’s assistants: LAURYN STONE and TESS OAKLAND

For the past eight years, Korean American actor Daniel Henney has been juggling roles on both sides of the Pacific. Adored as a heartthrob in Korean dramas and films, Henney shot to stardom after playing Dr. Henry Kim in the drama My Lovely Sam Soon, and soon after that, became a household name in Korea, with leading man roles on the small and big screens, as well as high-profile ad campaigns, like the 2005 one for the South Korean fashion brand Bean Pole International that co-starred Gwyneth Paltrow.

The Michigan-born Henney had decided to relocate to Korea in the first place because he wasn’t getting the acting opportunities he wanted in the U.S. But when he got to Seoul, he realized he had a lot to learn before he could even be competitive in Hollywood. Now that he has fame and clout in Asia, many of Henney’s American fans, who have caught glimpses of him on X-Men Origins: Wolverine, the recent Schwarzenegger flick The Last Stand or even the short-lived CBS series Three Rivers, have wondered when the actor might be coming home to America for good.

Well, the answer is: he’s home. This doesn’t mean he’s given up his jet-setting lifestyle—his next two films include The Negotiator, an action film in Korea, and F*** I’m Pregnant, a romantic comedy in China—but he has a place in Los Angeles and is preparing for the right opportunity to break into the U.S. market.

“It’s very different for me [in the States] than it is in Asia,” Henney says. “In Asia, I get [offered] a lot of great leading roles, whereas here, I get a few, but I’m not quite where I want to be yet.”

You might say a little Asian American indie film called Shanghai Calling came along at exactly the right time. In Shanghai Calling, Henney plays Sam Chao, a Chinese American attorney who is transferred from the Manhattan office to Shanghai against his will and complies only because he wants to make partner. He—and everyone else—assumes he’ll be a natural working in China because of his heritage, when in reality, he’s less “Chinese” than any of the Caucasian expats he meets abroad. His arrogant assumptions often get him into trouble, and it takes some humility (and help from the locals) to dig himself out of a potentially career-ruining mess.

Vince shirt and pants, Generic Man shoes.

The film, which was released at select theaters in the U.S. last month, earned a slew of awards at film festivals last year, including a Best Actor nod for Henney at the Newport Beach (Calif.) Film Festival. It was a confidence booster for the actor, and he is now much choosier about the American roles that he takes. Although he joined the CBS hit show Hawaii Five-0 for a guest spot in late 2012 (on one of the series’ highest-rated episodes) and has been asked to come back for their season finale, he is hesitant.

“It was a lot of fun,” he says, of the tattooed ex-con character he played, “and I was excited that the ratings were good when I was on. But I just don’t want to go out in this crazy fight scene where I get killed, you know?”

When it comes to roles in his future, he’s thinking bigger, deeper, richer. What Henney wants now is to be a leading man in Hollywood. He is not naive to the fact that, even though there are many more Asian American male actors getting meatier roles than in previous decades, they aren’t necessarily considered “leading men” just yet. He’s careful to not assume he will be the first, but is also fully aware that he certainly could be.

While Henney has had top billing in Korea for many years, Shanghai Calling is not only his first lead in an English-language film, it’s also his first comedic role.

“I’m going to do this scene, but you have to reel me back if I go too far,” Henney recalls telling director Daniel Hsia.  “Remember, [I have to be an] asshole, but [a] likable asshole.”

While filming the movie, Henney says he learned there’s no such thing as a sense of humor, but senses of humor. “I have a very dry, sarcastic sense of humor,” he explains. “I get that from my father. A lot of people don’t get my jokes. If someone asks me, ‘How was your morning?’ I might say, ‘It sucks. I ran over my dog this morning, had to take her to the hospital before I came in.’” He laughs. “And it’s not even funny. It’s really not funny. But it’s funny to me.”

Sarar suit, shirt and tie, Mezlan shoes.

Hsia’s humor is more straightforward, according to Henney, as Hsia is a seasoned television comedy writer who knows how to deliver an effective punch line or sight gag.  Therefore, they had to find a way to merge their two styles.

“I think it worked out really well,” says Henney, “Daniel [Hsia] came up with the scenes, like the one with the tea cup,” referring to a perfectly-timed joke where Sam awkwardly slurps up some tea leaves at a business meeting and tries to play it cool. “That’s all Daniel. But I was the one that came up with the amount of asshole that Sam is.”

Though he doesn’t possess Sam’s cocky self-entitlement, Henney says he identified a great deal with Sam’s character.  Having been an expat in Korea for so many years, he understood what it was like to be plopped in the middle of a culture you don’t understand. However, Henney’s experience was likely magnified because his own fish-out-of-water story transpired with the entire nation watching.

Martin Chung, Henney’s friend and longtime manager, had a front row seat to Henney’s overnight rise to fame, having known the actor since his modeling days in Asia.

Around 2005, Henney landed an Olympus camera ad opposite Gianna Jun (Jun Ji-hyun), a Korean actress well-known for her roles in My Sassy Girl and Il Mare. During the shoot, her manager told Henney about a TV show that was casting, and he set up an impromptu meeting with the casting director and director of My Lovely Sam Soon.

The role of Dr. Henry Kim, the dashing American surgeon, was small at this point—Henney still couldn’t speak Korean, so how prominent could an English-speaking role in a Korean drama be?—so he packed one suitcase, thinking he’d stay for a couple months. However, that changed once Henney was introduced to Korean drama fans.

“Literally, right after the episode aired, my phone started ringing,” remembers Chung. “They were like, ‘Who is this guy?’ Magazines, reporters, commercial clients all started calling. I thought, ‘What the heck is going on?’”

“It was pretty surreal,” says Henney. “But I never took it seriously because I didn’t realize the clout or the power of the Korean drama. As a foreigner, I thought that the quality was pretty bad. At that time, it was shot on tape. Sam Soon was one of the first dramas filmed on HD film, which was brand new at the time.”

The writers started adding scenes for Henney to capitalize on the newfound fan flurry surrounding him, but imagine being given English lines that were written by native Korean speakers. In addition to his acting duties, Henney would often stay up nights rewriting the awkwardly phrased dialogue.

“After the 14th episode, I started to realize that 40 percent of the country was watching [My Lovely Sam Soon],” says Henney. “I couldn’t go anywhere without being recognized.  People were freaking out, and it kept getting bigger and bigger, to the point where I was meeting the president. One day, I was meeting the president, and next, I was flying to London to work with Gwyneth Paltrow.”

This was an excerpt of the cover story from the March 2013 issue of KoreAm.

To read the rest of Daniel’s story and see the rest of his amazing photo spread, purchase a single issue copy of the March issue, by clicking the “Buy Now” button below. (U.S. customers only. Expect delivery in 5-7 business days).

Wed.'s Link Attack: Daniel Dae Kim, Walking Dead, Daniel Henney

The Great GQ Pants-Off
GQ.com

Check out Hawaii Five-O’s Daniel Dae Kim in this GQ photoshoot.

This March we announced the Best New Designers in America and asked each of the six winners to redesign a pair of Dockers khakis. Here, Daniel Dae Kim of Hawaii Five-0 wears the pants.

the zombie engagement photos… set to music!
angryasianman

By now, you’ve heard of Ben and Juliana, the badass couple facing off against a zombie in those awesome engagement photos that went viral last week. But if you can’t get enough of them, check out this cool video by our composer pal George Shaw, who actually wrote a score and set the photos to music:

Check out the iAmKoreAm.com story about the zombie engagement photos and interview with Juliana!

Asian Americans face new stereotype in ads
Washington Post

Here is an interesting piece on Asian Americans in TV commercials that points out that Asians are often cast as tech support-types with technological know-how.

‘Walking Dead’: Four New Clips Feast On Your Brains
MTV.com

At a scant 11 seconds each, the clips themselves don’t show, tell or even imply much new information about the season, but they do feature pretty much the most important of the show’s assets: Realistic-looking zombies and stark, abject terror. Featuring returning castmembers like Andrew Lincoln, Steven Yeun, Laurie Holden and others, the teasers show off the bleak, zombie-infested world established in the series’ first six-episode season.

Producer imbues Korean color to math animation
Korea Times

“Team Umizoomi” is a popular animated show for preschoolers airing on [Nick Jr.], solving everyday problems using math. Milly, her brother Geo and robot friend Bot work in a team, travelling in Umi Car to settle such daily problems as fixing a watering can.

The animation has a hint of Korean culture — the characters fly kites and the patterns on Milly and Geo’s clothes and of the buildings come from traditional Korean designs. Soo Kim, producer and design director of the show, has contributed to its unique atmosphere. “The characters have simple black eyes, just like Koreans,” Kim said in a telephone interview with The Korea Times.

Born in Korea, Kim immigrated to the United States when she was a child. She majored in pre-medical studies as most Korean-American children do.

Check out our April 2010 feature story on Kim and Umizoomi.

USC’s Dornsife College introduces new minor in Korean Studies
The Daily Trojan

Beginning this semester, USC is offering a new minor in Korean Studies. The 20-unit minor will cover the political, economic, social and cultural changes in Korea. It will be interdisciplinary in nature, with course subjects spanning departments such as cinema, history, international relations, language and critical studies with a particular emphasis on Korea. There is no language requirement, but students are welcome to take Korean language courses to fulfill minor requirements.

Chiu and Kim are making a quick trip to Burning Man
San Francisco Bay Guardian

Board of Supervisors President David Chiu will take a day off from his busy mayoral campaign next week to attend Burning Man, which he’ll fly into on a small private airplane along with Sup. Jane Kim and spend less than 24 hours on the ground.

Daniel Henney Says He’s a ‘Regular Korean Guy’
soompi.com

Daniel Henney is handsome.

Choi Sung Bong confesses that he tried to commit suicide
allkpop.com

The “Korean Susan Boyle” told CNN, “I felt like my life was meaningless so I attempted to commit suicide multiple times.” He added, “I felt calm when I listened to music, music was my only friend when I was lonely.”

In First, South Korea Votes on Social Policy
New York Times

Voters in Seoul went to the polls on Wednesday to do what South Koreans had never done before: cast ballots in a referendum on welfare policy — in this case, whether to provide all children with free lunches regardless of family income.

For weeks, placards supporting or opposing the proposal have greeted citizens throughout this metropolis of 10 million people. Although the referendum was confined to the capital, it assumed national proportions with all political parties joining the debate in a sign that, after decades of bickering over civil liberties, the economy and North Korea, they were now entering the largely untested field of social welfare.

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Friday's Link Attack: Sandra Oh, Daniel Henney, Somali Pirates

Interview with Hollywood actress Sandra Oh
allkpop

Sandra spoke of her love for Korea as a Korean-Canadian and her hopes to one day star in a Korean movie. She also talked about the inside stories behind “Grey’s Anatomy” and how she was cast into the show.

“If I am to be cast in a Korean movie, I will be happy to take any role. I will study Korean, and if I don’t have any lines, I can act with just my facial expressions. I’ve always wanted to attend the Busan Film Festival, but I was always caught up with work. I want to attend the festival with a piece I star in.”

Somali pirates holding S. Korean hostages demand release of captured pirates
Yonhap

Somali pirates holding four South Koreans in a hijacked chemical tanker are demanding that Seoul pay ransom for the hostages and release five pirates captured during a January raid of a seized Korean freighter, an official said Friday.

The four South Koreans are among 25 crew members of the Singapore-registered 21,000-ton MT Gemini that was hijacked on April 30 in waters off Kenya. The seizure came about three months after South Korean naval commandos raided a Korean-owned freighter on Jan. 21 and rescued all 21 crew members.

N.Korean Defectors Flock to U.K.
Chosun Ilbo

Some 581 North Korean defectors have been given asylum in the United Kingdom, making them the largest group of all defectors in countries other than South Korea.

Korean young guns impress at British Open
AFP via Google

South Korean young guns Noh Seung-Yul and Hwang Jung-Gon led the Asian charge at the British Open on Thursday, signaling their talent with sub-par rounds at Royal St George’s.

Where in The World is Daniel Henney?
soompi.com

Daniel Henney recently wrapped shooting on the buddy flick with Bill Paxton tentatively titled “Americatown” and apologized to fans for not being online lately.

I know it’s been FOREVER since I’ve chimed in. My apologies. We’ve been in China for 1.5 months now shooting this film, and it’s been incredibly difficult to get online. Anyway, I’m back now, and will update you with some pics very soon…Pics from my last 1.5 months spent in China.

SUNY Gets OK for Campus in Songdo
The Wall Street Journal

Soon South Korean students seeking a U.S. diploma might be able to do so without even getting a stamp in their passports.

The Ministry of Education announced Wednesday that it has given final approval to Stony Brook University — or the State University of New York at Stony Brook — to open a campus in Songdo, the newly established international business district near Incheon International Airport.

Koreans turn to dog soup to beat the heat
Reuters via ABC News (Australia)

Thursday was not a good day to be a dog in South Korea. That’s because it was one of the three hottest days according to the Korean lunar calendar – and dog soup is one way to beat the heat.

On “Chobok,” people seeking to protect the body from overheating eat traditional healthy foods such as ginseng chicken soup, broiled eel and “bo-shin-tang,” literally “body preservation stew”.

Dogs are bred to be eaten in South Korea, and advocates say bo-shin-tang, which consists of dog meat boiled in a mix of hot and strong spices and vegetables, is good for the health. It is considered a delicacy by some.

Korean BBQ Trivia + Forage’s Soy and Coca-Cola Flank Steak Recipe
LA Weekly

If you’ve ever wondered if Korean households have dining tables with built in bbq holes, like the ones at Korean bbq restaurants, the answer is “no”. The historical antecedent for modern restaurant tables are traditional Korean kitchens with round stoves (agungi) that were fueled by wood or large cylindrical charcoal briquets. If you clicked on the link, you probably figured out why Korean bbq pans are dome shaped, rather than square or rectangular.

FC Barcelona signs Korean teen for five years
JoongAng Daily

A Korean teenager has signed a five-year contract with FC Barcelona’s youth team, his father revealed Wednesday.

Play Canceled on Account of Suicide Threat
The Korea Times

A nude play has been forced to cancel its performance on July 14 by a male member of the public.

The man threatened to commit suicide if “The Professor and the Female Student 2” goes on stage on that date. He claimed that star actress Um Da-hae, 30, who plays the female student, is “his woman.”

Korean gangsters invade Manila
The Manila Times

THE Philippine National Police (PNP) was warned Monday against the entry into the country of Korean criminal syndicates that wanted to establish their illegal network in the country.