Tag Archives: Jay Park


‘Show Me the Money 4′ to Hold Concerts in L.A. and NYC

by REERA YOO | @reeraboo

After much speculation, Mnet has confirmed that popular Korean hip-hop competition series Show Me the Money 4 will be holding concerts in two U.S. cities next month.

In each season of Show Me the Money, a group of promising rappers undergo open auditions, one-on-one battles and other challenges for the chance to perform in front of a live audience and win a cash prize. Experienced rappers divide surviving contestants into small teams and serve as producers to them.

Over 7,000 contestants, including K-pop idols, underground rappers and veteran emcees, auditioned for the show’s fourth season. Bobby of the upcoming K-pop boy band iKON was crowned the champion last year after pairing up with producers Dok2 and The Quiett of Team Illionaire.

For the Show Me the Money 4 concerts held in Los Angeles and New York City, producers Tablo, Jinusean, Paloalto, San E, Verbal Jint, Jay Park and Loco will be performing with the show’s top 4 contestants. Although producer Zico is not listed as a performer for the U.S. concerts, he will be participating in the show’s Seoul and Busan concerts, which will be held on Sept. 5 and Oct. 10, respectively.

The L.A. concert will take place on Thursday, Sept. 10 at Shrine Expo Hall. Doors open at 7 p.m. while the concert starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are currently on sale, retailing from $60 to $200.

Meanwhile, the New York concert is scheduled to be held on Saturday, Sept. 12 at 7:30 p.m. at the Best Buy Theater. Tickets are a bit pricier than the L.A. concert, with the price starting at $100. While the L.A. concert does not have an age restriction, the Best Buy Theater requires all attendees to be 16 years old and over.

You can purchase tickets and learn more information about the concerts via AXSShow Me the Money 4′s semifinals will air on Friday, Aug. 21 in South Korea. Who are you rooting for?

Team Zico & Paloalto

Team San E & Verban Jint

Team Loco & Jay Park

Team YG (Tablo & Jinusean)


H/T to Soompi. Featured image via Powerhouse.

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Win a Pair of Tickets to AOMG’s L.A. Concert This Friday

Do you have plans for this upcoming Friday night? Cancel them.

AOMG is kicking off their U.S. tour in Los Angeles at the Belasco Theater, and we want to get you in for free! We have a pair of tickets to give away to one lucky individual, who will be able to see Jay Park, Simon D, Gray, Loco and DJ Pumkin perform for free! They’ll also be able to join the after party at Supperclub in Hollywood.

Here’s how you can win: Tell us who is your favorite artist out of the performers at the concert and why. Leave your comment below, or on this article’s Facebook post.

The winner will be announced at 1 p.m. Pacific Time on KoreAm‘s Facebook page. The KoreAm staff will choose the individual whose response shows the most passion for their AOMG artist!

Rules: Contestants must be age 21 and over. Tickets will be available only by will call at the box office. Concert stubs will grant free entry to the after party until 11 p.m.

Even if you don’t win the tickets, take heart! KoreAm readers can get 40 percent off general admission tickets. Instead of paying $50, you’ll only be paying about $30! Click here for more details.


EXCLUSIVE DEAL: 40% Off Tickets for AOMG Concert in L.A.

If you live in Los Angeles, you have plenty of places to be out and about on Friday nights. Allow us to present a very good reason to drop those plans.

AOMG is kicking off its U.S. tour this Friday at the Belasco Theater in Los Angeles, and they’re inviting KoreAm readers to join the party! General admission tickets are 40 percent off when you use the code “youtube” at checkout, which drops the price from $50 to $30! You can buy the tickets here.

The spectacular lineup features Jay Park, Simon D, Gray, Loco and DJ Pumkin. Get your tickets soon before they’re sold out!

Time: 7:30 p.m.; Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Location: The Belasco Theater
1050 S. Hill Street Los Angeles, CA 90015

If you’re 21 and over, be sure to hit up the after party! Your concert stub from the show will grant you free entry until 11 p.m.


After Party Time: 10 p.m. – 2 a.m.

Location: 6675 Hollywood Blvd. Los Angeles, CA

Those of you on the East Coast, fear not — AOMG’s tour continues in New York and Washington D.C. on Saturday, Nov. 15 and Thursday, Nov. 20, respectively.


‘Bad Rap’ Documentary Asks: Where Are The Asian American Rappers?


Ever since hip-hop took off in the South Bronx in the 1970s, rappers around the world have embraced the music and culture, with many carving out their own identities and establishing themselves as mainstream stars.

But what about Asian American rappers? Though several have stomped onto the scene, from pioneers such as the Mountain Brothers, Jin and Lyrics Born, to stars of today including Far East Movement and Jay Park, these aren’t the names that we immediately associate with hip-hop in mainstream American culture.

Why not? Is it a lack of support? Their appearance? Not having that breakout hit? Filmmakers Salima Koroma (director/producer) and Jaeki Cho (producer) are looking to explore that question with Bad Rap, a new documentary about the Asian American presence in hip hop.




Bad Rap focuses on the perspectives of four Asian American rappers: Dumbfoundead, Awkwafina, Rekstizzy and Lyricks. Each has their own story, style and attitude, but they all share the same goal: to make it big. Yet they all encounter challenges in a culture that still expects them to fit the model minority stereotype.

With insight and appearances from Far East Movement, Jay Park, Jin, Traphik, Decipher, Kero One, The Fung Bros, Ted Chung and Oliver Wang, Bad Rap looks to shed light on the Asian American hip-hop culture and highlight the up-and-coming stars.

Salima Jaeki

Salima Koroma (left) and Jaeki Cho

As of now, Koroma and Cho are looking to add on their 40-minute film, and they are asking for support via Indiegogo. All proceeds will go towards adding more content to complete a 70-minute feature, as well as finalizing the film for its eventual premiere.

The idea for Bad Rap began with a “mutual obsession” with hip-hop. Koroma first reached out to Cho, who had written a piece on K-pop star G-Dragon when she was searching for a subject to cover for her thesis at Columbia University. Cho’s journey with hip-hop began with listening to Drunken Tiger when he was 10 years old, and that led to a career in music journalism.

Check out the trailer below, and follow the project on their Indiegogo page, as well as on Facebook, TwitterInstagram and YouTube.


Traphik (Timothy DeLaGhetto)



Jay Park

Jay Park


Far East Movement

Images via Bad Rap Film Indiegogo Page


Lady Gaga Attends ‘K-Pop Night Out’ at SXSW, Headlined by Jay Park, HyunA


K-pop fans were treated to the second manifestation of “K-Pop Night Out” on Tuesday night as part of the annual South by Southwest (SXSW) festival in Austin, Texas. One fan just happened to be one of the biggest acts in pop music.

Before the show, KoreAm was watching fans flock to a steadily growing line in front of the Elysium Nightclub that ran down Seventh Street; they could barely contain themselves waiting for the rockstar list of performers hailing from Korea. Despite the obvious disappointment about Kiha and the Faces’ last-minute cancellation due to visa issues, the remaining acts valiantly filled the void.


Jambiani enthralled the crowd with their eclectic blend of haegeum, the piri and the geomungo with electric guitars and electronics. Nell delighted fans and newbies alike with their hit anthem, “Ocean of Light.” Hollow Jan took over for Kiha and the Faces. Designated by the dozen photogs and international press lining the back of the club as “Korea’s only screamo band” — or emotional hardcore punk augmented by screamed lyrics — the band won over a few new fans of their own.

Crying Nut continued the controlled chaos, rocking out with screaming guitars and an accordion occasionally played with a microphone. Yes, Kim Insoo smashed a microphone onto his accordion and used it as brilliantly as a cellist would a bow, just far more punk.

Idiotape followed by moving everyone in all directions with their synthesized dance beats, prompting an inspired electronic fan to scream out, “This is what Daft Punk should have done for Tron: Legacy!”


Suddenly, the crowd went nuts as the “Goddess of Love” herself, Lady Gaga, moved to the front of the room amid a frenzy of reporters and cameras. After security ushered her to a riser behind the ticket booth, social media exploded with pride for Lady Gaga’s support of K-pop. The phones used to capture and record the Gaga experience sprouted like mushrooms and remained there for the rest of the show.

Jay Park, a former Gaga interviewer in 2009, confessed to a slight bout of fatigue following the familiar 14-hour flight to the States, but the Seattle native still managed to  electrify the stage. He danced, sang and rapped with his new AOMG label act, Loco, amid a steady stream of screams with the occasional swoon.

The night concluded with the first solo U.S. performance by 4minute’s HyunA. Only a total of 15 minutes, her four-song set featured the You Tube hit “Bubble Pop” that had Gaga moving a bit. Expect this showcase to monumentally expand K-pop curiosity in Austin and SXSW for many years to come.



Photo via New York Times.

K-Pop Concerts Across America: A Year in Review

Photos via MTV K

by Linda Son

Last April, when a car pulled up to the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Los Angeles, it became hard for those waiting in the crowd to breathe, let alone move, as throngs of young people flocked to the automobile.

The group of diehard fans of Korean pop music, or K-pop, whispered among themselves as they craned their necks and stood on tiptoes to get a clearer look into the car. “Who is it? Is it someone I know?” Their hopes were usually dashed as an average hotel guest would emerge from the car. But sometimes, the person in the car was actually the pop music celebrity they were waiting for to arrive and pandemonium would ensue.

The evenly dispersed group would transform into one enormous mass of people and many would find themselves being pushed into nearby strangers. Cameras would begin flashing and the air became filled with shouts of different Korean phrases: from simply calling out the artists’ name to declarations of love and adoration. Decked out in big sunglasses or hats to hide their makeup-less faces, the stars would try to make their way through the fans, sometimes stopping for a few autographs, never a picture, until their staff members or managers would usher them inside. When the star successfully made their way to the elevators, the crowd would simmer down until another car pulled up to the Sheraton, then the madness would start all over again and continue until the wee hours of the morning.

The hotel, famous for housing K-pop stars this time of year, sees this scene almost every April and this year was no exception to the fangirl madness as scores of people waited outside the Sheraton to catch a glimpse of their favorite singers. The reason? L.A.’s annual Korean Music Festival.


Nine years in the making, KMF, as it’s known to many of its patrons, has featured top K-pop acts such as TVXQ, Girls Generation, Big Bang, Wonder Girls and Super Junior. This year, the Korea Times and other sponsors brought out Jay Park, 4Minute, G.NA, U-Kiss, Secret, Sistar, Baek Ji Young, K.Will and DJ DOC among other singers of trot music and traditional Korean music.

“There is much more excitement in seeing the band you love live than through a computer screen,” said Ann Yang, a first-time attendee of KMF. For much of the show, Yang was up on her feet, dancing and singing to the songs she knew, along with the thousands of other fans in attendance.

G.NA and DJ DOC’s own Kim Chan Ryul played hosts for the star-studded event, which was seen by thousands of people who traveled from all over North America and beyond.

K-pop garnered more attention in 2011 than ever before. YouTube announced its official categorization of K-pop as a genre on its music page, providing easy access to videos. This year also showed K-pop’s popularity in the United States where a number of concerts were held and dozens of Korean artists not only delighted their overseas fans but also performed to sold out crowds or at venues that were near capacity.

The Korean Music Festival used to be the only concert where North Americans could travel a reasonable distance to see K-pop artists perform live. These artists, however, are more frequently stopping by the U.S. to perform for their international fans.

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Photo Highlights from Unforgettable 2011

The staff here at KoreAm is still going over the thousands of photos from this past Saturday’s Unforgettable 2011 event, but we wanted to go ahead and share a couple with all of you dear readers. Stay tuned, as we will be uploading more complete galleries of photos from the red carpet, dinner program, and after party.

We’re also uploading many of the videos from the event on our YouTube channel here. Currently we just have profile videos of the award recipients, but soon we’ll have more videos from the actual live event itself.


Wednesday's Link Attack: G-Dragon, Kim Jong Il, SAT Cheaters

‘Glee’ Roars Into the World of Tiger Moms, Dads and Cubs
Wall Street Journal

Count me among the legions of Asian American Gleeks who’ve been irritably waiting for show producers Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk and Ian Brennan to do something interesting with Harry Shum Jr.’s peripatetic footballer-turned-dance machine, Mike Chang. Really, RyBrI: After two years of back-bench toil as the mostly mute “Other Asian,” there isn’t a performer on the show who’s earned a turn in the spotlight more than Harry. And given the season-opener revelation that Chang is a senior, with little likelihood of sticking around on the show post-McKinley, this season could represent Shum’s final chance to shine.

A Closer Look: Back from Libya
The Daily Bruin (UCLA)

Chris Jeon reminisces about his time fighting in the Libyan revolution and living with rebels.

Rain’s final concert this Sunday

Weeping will ensue en masse this weekend, as South Korea’s biggest pop star and Stephen Colbert’s arch-nemesis, Rain, will perform in the public for the last time before enlisting in the South Korean military. The “Ninja Assassin” star’s free good-bye concert will be held on Sunday, October 9, as part of the Gangnam Fashion Festival 2011.

It is sure to be a tearful affair on both sides: “Concerts to me are like life on a smaller scale,” Rain told CNN Talk Asia in 2009. Rain begins his mandatory, 22-month, Republic of Korea Army service on Tuesday, October 11.

Big Bang’s G-Dragon caught smoking marijuana

But did he inhale?


Koreans make their mark in Fairfax
Fairfax Times (Va.)

When Steve Choi and his family moved to Virginia from South Korea in 1974, his sixth-grade classmates wanted to touch his hair, or challenge him to a fight–sometimes both.

“A lot of them had never even met an Asian before, so even my hair was very interesting to them,” said Choi, who now runs a highly successful food service company and serves as President of the Korean-American Association of the Washington Metro area, based in Annandale. “Everybody thought I was Bruce Lee- they wanted to fight me to see if I knew kung-fu.”

These days, Koreans are no longer the novelty they once were in the region. Korean immigration to the U.S. was negligible prior to 1970, but since that year some 973,450 South Koreans have obtained permanent resident status in the U.S. and the Washington, D.C. metro area has the third largest Korean population in the country behind Los Angeles and New York.

The Torrid Romantic Life of Kim Jong-il
Chosun Ilbo

Yun Hye-yong was a woman beyond the reach even of North Korean dictator Kim Jong-il. Yun, the lead singer of Kim’s former favorite band Pochonbo Electronic Ensemble, was brutally executed after she spurned Kim’s persistent advances and fell in love with another man.

Or so claims Chang Jin-song, an author formerly affiliated with the North Korean Workers’ Party, in “Kim Jong-il’s Last Woman.” Published in May, it is an epic poem that details Kim’s private life and inside story of his regime based on the true story of the Pochonbo Electronic Ensemble.

SAT cheaters
Korea Times

A famous SAT teacher in Korea was caught illegally discussing what was on the exam. He used the time difference between the United States and other countries to tell his students what will be on the test.

As students talked after the test, some of them, without noticing, told others that they had known what was going to be on the exam.

Since SAT scores are based on percentages, the other students felt this was unfair and reported the incident to the College Board. All the tests taken in Korea were voided and the efforts of those who actually worked hard came to naught.

However, the worst part starts here. As more and more people found out about the SAT teacher, more and more parents tried to send their kids to him so their children could attain high scores. It is shocking that some parents care more about children’s short-term goal of getting into a good college instead of looking to the distant future of their children.

Korean Official: US will endorse FTA with Korea by Oct. 21
Korea Times

Trade Minister Kim Jong-hoon said Wednesday that the U.S. Congress is expected to give a final endorsement of a free trade agreement with Korea by Oct. 21 at the latest.

Olympic figure skating champion Kim Yu-na named ambassador for 2012 Winter Youth Games
AP via Washington Post

Olympic figure skating champion Kim Yu-na will help promote the first Winter Youth Games.

The IOC says the 21-year-old South Korean skater will join Olympic ski champions Lindsey Vonn and Benjamin Raich as an “ambassador” for the games, which will be held in Innsbruck, Austria, from Jan. 13-22.

Jay Park interview with channelAPA.com

Over the weekend at 2011 ISA LA, channelAPA.com had a chance to chat with Jay Park about his music and dance careers. With a huge following in both USA and Asia, we talk about opportunities for Asian Americans in both regions. He shared with us about his strategy straddling the East and West. Jay Park has already release several singles including Single Life, Demon, Bestie & Speechless. He’s even done several collabos like Clouds and Maybe One Day. He might not have an English album soon, but he’s working on new English tracks. In the meantime, he’ll be busy promoting his upcoming Korean film “Mr. Idol” and a Korean album in November.