Tag Archives: restaurants

Tuesday's Link Attack: Kimchi Fines, Hollywood Missionary, Hines Ward

Restaurants Sour on Rules Over Kimchi
Wall Street Journal

Lidea Park, owner of Duck Hyang restaurant in Queens, says she makes kimchi with trepidation.

Ever since she received seven violation points during a city health inspection in June, she’s been fearful about how her restaurant prepares and stores kimchi, a traditional fermented dish that is a staple in Korean cuisine. The violation points resulted from five pounds of kimchi being left at room temperature and exceeding the city Department of Health’s 41-degree temperature requirement for cold foods, according to the inspection.

“They don’t understand the kimchi,” said Ms. Park. “Many Korean restaurants with kimchi get points because the inspector, they don’t understand what it is.”

Korean restaurant and business groups say they are all too often unfairly penalized by the health department because their fermented foods are determined to be above 41 degrees, the temperature below which city rules require potentially hazardous prepared cold food be stored.

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Great Falls man pleads guilty in contracting scam
Washington Post

A Great Falls man has admitted he played a key role in what authorities have described as one of the most brazen federal contracting scams in U.S. history, according to court records that became public Monday.

Young N. Cho, who also goes by the first name of Alex, pleaded guilty to conspiracy and bribery charges at a secret hearing in September — just weeks before federal agents arrested four other men in a $20 million scheme that targeted the Army Corps of Engineers.

Cho’s plea deal became public after a federal judge ordered it unsealed.

Cho, 40, was chief technology officer of Nova Datacom, a Chantilly-based information technology company that did work with the Army Corps. His role in the scam began in 2007 when he began passing kickbacks to two program managers at the Army Corps in exchange for lucrative contracts, according to court papers.

Background Extra Recounts His Unlikely Spiritual Mission
Media Bistro

LA native Steve Cha has a B.A. in Asian American Studies from UCLA and is currently working on an M.A. in theology at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena. Along the way, he also worked for several years as a professional background extra.

Earlier this year, Cha published a book about his on-set experiences called Hollywood Mission: Possible. With Christmas and Tom Cruise upon us, he is re-promoting a tale of, essentially, the Tim Tebow of background extras:

During his three-year journey, Steve evangelized many famous actors, actresses, directors, and aspirants in Tinsel Town… Steve’s revealing autobiography recounts how the gospel was shared with celebrities such as Steven Spielberg, Brad Pitt, Harrison Ford, Dan Aykroyd, and many other stars.

Hines Ward in ‘Dark Knight Rises’ trailer
CBS Sports

“Dark Knight Rises,” the latest in the line of Batman movies from Christopher Nolan, is slated to hit theaters in July of 2012. But the full trailer hit the Internets over the weekend and guess who makes a cameo: Hines Ward!

We already knew that a slew of Steelers players were playing roles in the movie as members of the Gotham Rogues, whose home field is set at Heinz Field, but not until my younger brother chatted me on Sunday did I realize that Ward was actually in the preview.

You can check out Ward’s appearance at the 1:15 mark below as he runs from not just defenders, but a slew of explosions set by Bane, the movie’s villain, who’s basically like an evil version of Rob Gronkowski, who is also hell-bent on blowing up Heinz Field (only metaphorically) and quite clearly a efficient killing machine created by scientists.

Chul Hyun Ahn explores the Infinite Void
Baltimore City Paper

You can walk all the way around it for hours, but to fully experience artist Chul Hyun Ahn’s “Void Platform,” you have to take off your shoes (as signs prompt you to do) and walk out onto it.

The “out” inserts itself in that sentence because of the nature of the piece. In the front gallery at C. Grimaldis Gallery on North Charles Street, Ahn has constructed a low 10-foot-by-8-foot plywood-faced platform that appears to cover a yawning pit descending through the floor as far as the eye can see, albeit a pit lined with subtle bands of greenish lighting. You find yourself testing the surface with your sock-encased toes, curious to know if it will hold your weight. It will, but you hesitate a little anyway. You step onto the smooth surface and stand over what seems to be infinite space receding away below your feet. But if the surface of the piece didn’t hold your weight, you’d drop a mere 16 inches onto Grimaldis’ wooden floor.

Why it’s great to be a foreign traveler in Korea
CNNGo

With so many foreign travelers visiting Korea on shopping sprees, it seems Korea has been busy devising ways to say “visit often’ and “thank you” at the same time.

There is so much special treatment for foreign travelers, we wonder why Koreans aren’t more envious.

Here are five benefits of being a foreign traveler in Korea.

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Friday's Link Attack: Pepero Day, Asian dining, Jeju Island

Today is Pepero Day in South Korea
Giant Robot

The calendar says 11/11/11, which means one thing in South Korea: Pepero Day. They call it Pepero Day because these skinny, chocolate covered biscuits resemble the numbers that make up the date 11/11. It’s huge holiday over there, with markets and convenient stores decked out with fancy displays and gift baskets of these snacks, a knock off of the more familiar Pocky brand. The concept is that you gift boxes of these confectionary treats to your significant other as a symbol of your affection.

Jonathan Gold’s 99 Essential L.A. Restaurants 2011
L.A. Weekly

I like trucks, taco tables and pop-ups as much as the next guy, but I was really hoping to find evidence pointing to a resurgence in fine dining, powered by exposure to complex cooking on food television, and the vast numbers of people coming out of training programs like Cordon Bleu or the CIA. Alas, I did not.

Instead, when I looked at the new heroes of cooking in America, I kept seeing Lukshon’s Sang Yoon, Kogi’s Roy Choi and ramen-slinging David Chang of New York’s Momofuku: Asian-born guys classically trained in European techniques, working in great American kitchens, who decided to redirect their imagination toward street food. Their dishes have a directness of flavor, and their high-low juxtapositions still have the ability to shock, even in a world where pandan leaf and calamansi lime have become nearly as common as salt and pepper.

Danji’s Hooni Kim Hits Tori Shin Early for the Good Stuff
Eater NY

Chef Hooni Kim of Danji praises Upper East Side yakitori staple Tori Shin.

“I get my yakitori fix at Tori Shin. It’s usually filled with Japanese businessmen and the decor, service, etc give it a real authentic feel. I like to watch the grill chefs twirl the skewers so rhythmically it looks like they’re playing an instrument. My favorites are the following skewers: skin, gizzard, and wing. If you get there early enough you can try the specials which include knee bone, cartilage, hearts, and livers.”

Theater review: ‘The Language Archive’ at East West Players
Los Angeles Times

The play, which won the 2010 Susan Smith Blackburn Prize and premiered at South Coast Repertory last year, depends considerably on its actors’s charms. Happily, director Jessica Kubzansky’s cast mines the comedy and pathos of Cho’s appealing characters: Chang exudes a youthful buoyancy, and Mashita’s smaller roles are played with brisk, delightful discipline. Yu’s droll, relationship-challenged George sells the play’s quicksilver emotional shifts, keeping us invested in his journey. “We are the only two speakers of [our] language,” a desperate George explains to his wife, referring to that unique dialect of private jokes and shorthand that develops within a relationship over time. Forget the linguistics of lost cultures — it takes two for pillow talk.

The play’s preciousness can diminish its dramatic power, and this production doesn’t always find the edges. Cho tends to tell us things about feelings when we’d rather see them played out. Still, “The Language Archive” poignantly anatomizes the speeches and silence of love, requited and not.


Family of woman killed by falling 70-foot tree explores lawsuit
Los Angeles Times

The father of a woman who was killed when a nearly 70-foot eucalyptus tree fell on her car in a Costa Mesa intersection has hired a Beverly Hills lawyer to explore filing a lawsuit.

Haeyoon Miller, 29, was sitting at a red light near Newport Harbor High School when the tree, planted in a median, crashed onto her blue Hyundai.

According to witnesses, emergency crews were able to lift the tree but then it slipped back onto the car.

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Flushing clinics in Medicare sweep
Queens Chronicle

Four Queens residents have been charged in federal court with submitting about $11.7 million in fraudulent Medicare claims from two medical clinics in Flushing.

An indictment charges that Ho Yon Kim, 85, of Flushing; Hoy Yat Kam, 57 of Flushing; Elaine Kim, 50, of Bayside; Gilbert Kim, 59, of Bayside; Peter Lu, 36, of Manhattan and John Knox, 54, of the Bronx submitted $11.7 million in false claims through the URI Medical Center, believed to be on Farrington Street in Flushing, and Sarang Medical PC believed to be on 38th Ave.

South Korea beats UAE 2-0 in World Cup qualifier
Yahoo Sports

World Cup regular South Korea was closer to booking a spot in Asia’s fourth and final round of qualifiers for Brazil 2014 with a hard-fought 2-0 win over United Arab Emirates on Friday.

Lee Keun-ho and captain Park Chu-young scored late second-half goals to keep the unbeaten Koreans on top of Group B after four matches.

South Korea beat UAE 2-1 at home a month ago, but didn’t expect as hard a match as it got on Friday.

Whistler Fest to honor quartet
Variety

The Whistler Film Festival will honor actors Patton Oswalt, Andy Serkis, Jay Baruchel and director Jennifer Yuh Nelson during its 11th edition, running Nov. 30-Dec. 4.

Nelson, director of DreamWorks’ “Kung Fu Panda 2,” will be honored with the WFF’s first Trailblazer in Animation award, which will be presented by Gaydos on Dec. 3. Nelson is the first woman to solo-direct an animated film from a major studio.

Beyond tangerines and palm trees: Jeju’s unique culture
Yonhap News

Every culture, by definition, is unique, and especially so is that of Jeju Island, a volcanic tourist attraction off the southern tip of the Korean Peninsula.

Jeju’s culture has developed over thousands of years as a result of its people’s relationship with nature, animistic religion and mythology.

The first place in the world to receive UNESCO designations in all three natural science categories, Jeju has its cultural foundation in the animistic belief among its people that the island is home to 18,000 gods.

Healthy Alternatives to Binge-Drinking a New Trend at Office Gatherings
Chosun Ilbo

Getting pass-out-drunk on heady combinations of beer and soju is almost expected by Korean companies whenever work get-togethers are organized, but many corporations are bucking the trend by refocusing such events on healthier pursuits.

One company that handles publicity for food and beverage and apparels makers in Seoul found that its booze-drinking sessions were leaving its employees drained and unproductive. This prompted it to embark on a high-octane evening trip that let them vent their stress in other ways, such as by screaming their way through hair-rising roller-coaster rides.

“We often work overtime in the evening and the workers get really stressed out,” said the head of the company. “But when we are forced to attend company dinners, staff often complain that they get even more tired, so we decided to replace such gatherings with trips to an amusement park.”

Jeju – The Island
Vimeo

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Tuesday's Link Attack: North Korea, Suicide, Opening Ceremony

Moving on when mom is killed at war
CNN.com

It was only natural for Kristin Choe to begin drawing. Even at age 3, she expressed herself through art.

And that’s exactly what she did in the months after her mother, Navy Lt. Florence Bacong Choe, 35, was killed by an Afghan army soldier in March 2009.

The little girl took out crayons and a sheet of paper and began coloring in some green grass. Her father, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Chong “Jay” Choe, thought Kristin was drawing the family’s home. But the final sketch proved to be much more: a symbol of their new life and a little girl’s loving memory of her mom. Dad didn’t know what to make of the drawing. It left him speechless.

Yet he kept the picture as a reminder of everything that changed the moment Florence was killed. “When I think about what’s next — how do you press on? how do you live your life? — I think of Kristin first and foremost.”

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South Korea Approves Sending Medical Aid to North
New York Times

South Korea on Tuesday authorized the World Health Organization to resume distribution of Seoul-financed medical aid to North Korea, amid growing international calls for humanitarian assistance for malnourished North Korean children.

The decision “was based upon our belief that purely humanitarian support for the young and vulnerable in North Korea should continue,” a senior Unification Ministry official told reporters Tuesday during a briefing given on condition of anonymity.

Student Spotlight: Zenia Kim
StyleBistro

Zenia Kim is an M.F.A. Fashion Design student, who recently debuted her work as part of the Italian Trade Commission Collection at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week. She also interned at Yigal Azrouel over the summer, and has spent the past few months exploring NYC and finding inspiration for her Senior Collection. Read on to hear about all of her eye-opening experiences!

Tackling South Korea’s high suicide rates
BBC News

More than 40 South Koreans a day are taking their lives and the government in Seoul has recognised it is a problem that needs tackling. But, as the BBC’s Lucy Williamson finds out, the reasons for such a high suicide rate are complicated and not easy to solve.

Senior actor found dead in apparent suicide
Korea Herald

A senior South Korean actor was found dead in his small rented room on Tuesday of an apparent suicide, police said.

Kim Choo-ryun, a 64-year-old actor who had his heyday in the 1970s, was found hanging in his studio in Gimhae, 449 kilometers southeast of Seoul, the police said.

He seemed to have killed himself the previous day after months of depression, they noted.

According to police, a suicide note found in Kim’s room, read, “I can hardly stand my loneliness and difficulties. I am sorry for my fans and family.”

11-11-11 is a popular wedding date
Bergen County Record

Krystle Patton, 27 and David Pak, 34, both of Hackensack, also picked Friday as their special day. They had been dating for several years when Pak proposed on Feb. 11, Valentine’s Day weekend. The two knew they would get married later that year.

“I had been waiting 5 1/2 years and wanted to get married in the fall, but I didn’t think we would get 11-11,” says Patton. “I know people had probably had that date booked forever, but someone just canceled and we took it.”

The couple, whose wedding will be at the Graycliff in Moonachie, found extra significance in the date. Pak is Korean, and Nov. 11 in South Korea is Pepero Day, similar to Valentine’s Day in the U.S. “It’s apparently our lucky number now,” says Patton.

Review: Momofuku Seiobo
Sydney Morning Herald

He does The Bun. Let’s get that out of the way right now. After months of claiming his famous steamed pork bun was not part of the plan at his new Momofuku Seiobo at The Star, David Chang has installed it on the $175, 15-course tasting menu. Thank the lord. It’s sweet and steamy, the pork belly in baby-bum-soft cushions of white bread, hit with hoisin sauce and cucumber, Sriracha chilli on the side. As the birthday bloke sitting next to me at the kitchen counter says: ”Ten more of those and a six-pack and I’ll die happy.”

This is the first Momofuku outside New York for Korean-American chef David Chang, recently named one of Time magazine’s 100 people who most affect our world.

Americans in Paris
The National (Dubai, U.A.E.)

Here’s a profile of the duo — Korean American Carol Lim and Chinese American Humberto Leon — behind fashion trendsetting company Opening Ceremony.

Lena Park Enjoys Belated Leap to the Big Time
Chosun Ilbo

The hit MBC TV reality show “I Am a Singer” was nothing if not transformational for Park. It has led to commercial contracts — the first since her debut — and requests to perform and appear on other TV programs. Park describes appearing on the show as a life-changing experience.

“In the past, only a few people recognized me on the street, but now everyone does,” she said. “But that has created a few problems too,” she added.

Born in Los Angeles, California in 1976, Park came to Korea to perform back in 1995 when she was studying acting at UCLA. She says her first days in Korea were tough, since she had to live by herself without knowing the language.

Rain Named Top Marksman at Boot Camp
Chosun Ilbo

Self-explanatory.

Free David Choe Print on 11/11/11 Just Do What He Asks
Giant Robot

Artist David Choe is hosting an elaborate giveaway for some very nice prints of his work. The giveaway, which coincides with Pepero Day on 11/11, will require fans to do four tasks.

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Prosecutors Probing SK Group’s Chairman
Wall Street Journal

SK Group, a South Korean conglomerate with businesses ranging from telecom to oil, said Tuesday that prosecutors visited its headquarters seeking financial documents, as part of an investigation into allegations the group’s chairman, Chey Tae-won, used company funds to cover personal investment losses.

Big Bang wins “Best Worldwide Act” at MTV’s 2011 Europe Music Awards
allkpop

Big Bang won the award for best “Worldwide Act” at the 2011 MTV Europe Music Awards.

How To Get A Korean Boyfriend
YouTube

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Tuesday's Link Attack: Yuna Kim, Ruxbin, Filmmaker Christina Choe

Yuna Kim may skip skating events for 12 months
JoongAng Daily

Korean figure skating icon Kim Yu-na said she has not decided whether to compete at the ISU World Figure Skating Championships next year.

After finishing her ice show, Samsung Galaxy-Hauzen All That Skate Summer 2011, at the Olympic Gymnasium in southern Seoul on Monday, Kim told reporters that she has not made up her mind on whether to participate at the Worlds, which start in March in Nice, France.

Ruxbin on Bon Appetit’s top 10 new restaurants list
Chicago Tribune

Ruxbin, the West Town eatery known for its eclectic interior and equally eclectic menu has just been named one of Bon Appetit’s Top 10 Best New Restaurants in America.

Yet those re-purposed church pews and theater seats, cookbooks-as-wall-art and pressed tin ceilings are just a backdrop for the culinary wizardry of Teddy Kim. He’s the Korean-American chef (his childhood nickname played off the kiddy character Teddy Ruxpin) who cleverly balances his menu: There’s pork belly salad (jicama, cornbread, bleu cheese, etc.) and a soba with green soy gelee and horseradish granita as well as Amish chicken, garlic fries with chipotle aioli and a berry shortcake with home-baked biscuit.

Restaurant Review: Danji
New York Times

DANJI is a wee little restaurant on West 52nd Street, done up in whitewashed brick and blond Ikea stylings, naked bulbs, extension cords and a lot of wooden spoons artfully displayed, as if by David Rockwell on a $200 budget. The crowds are fierce.

There is a good reason. Hooni Kim, who opened this place in December as a new-style Korean take on a Japanese izakaya, is a terrific cook. Those who take the time and care to explore his menu of both traditional and modernized Korean food will be rewarded.


US, South Korea Naval Drills Draw Threats From North
Voice of America

Speaking through its official media, Pyongyang has urged Seoul and Washington to call off the drills, saying they increase the likelihood of nuclear war.

A North Korean newscaster calls for the United States and South Korea to cancel the military exercises targeting the North if they want to normalize relations.

Christina Choe’s ‘FLOW’
Bay Citizen

Here’s a Q&A with Brooklyn, N.Y.-based filmmaker Christina Choe.

The director Christina Choe is no stranger to finding quirky takes on familiar material. Her previous film “The Queen”, about a teenager working at his parents dry cleaning shop while dreaming of going to the prom, played to great acclaim at Frameline in 2010.

5 best makgeolli bars in Seoul
CNNGo

Most people are aware of the makgeolli-led drinking revolution in Korea. The once-derided rice wine preferred by farmers has graduated from being a low-rent buzz to a full-fledged star of the after-hours scene, especially in Seoul.

But while makgeolli is now appreciated by almost everyone, it’s often still served in humble back alleys or tented pojangmachas. At these five Seoul bars, however, not only does makgeolli take precedence, the bars aren’t too shabby themselves.

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August Issue: K-pop Star Turned Chef Remakes Southern BBQ

Changing BBQ As We Know It

A K-pop-star-turned-chef brings a special brand of hot, hot, hot ingredients from the homeland to Southern palates.

story by Lola Pak
photographs by Matthew M. Wong

AS WITH PIZZA in New York City, the debate surrounding “authentic” barbecue in the South is as fiery as the wood-burning chambers it smokes in. So, in Atlanta, Ga., it would seem that an attempt to mess with traditional barbecue marinade by adding spicy Korean red pepper paste (gochujang) might not go over very well with some of the locals.

But when chefs Jiyeon Lee and Cody Taylor opened Heirloom Market BBQ last November, Georgians instead displayed Southern hospitality, embracing the restaurant’s unique, Korean-influenced culinary offerings.

Despite its location in a small, unassuming shack next to a liquor store on the outskirts of Atlanta, Heirloom has practically become an overnight success. The first of the restaurant’s 280 average daily customers (500 on weekends) can often be seen queuing up a half-hour before opening and just in time to catch Lee setting up the sidewalk chalkboard with the day’s specials. Reviewers on Yelp have raved about the soft, smoky texture of the gochujang-laden ribs and launched the restaurant to the city’s top-rated eatery for the term barbecue.

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That’s a particularly notable accomplishment for Lee, a native of Korea who was a famous Korean pop star during the 1980s and admitted she wasn’t initially a big fan of American barbecue. After she immigrated to the United States in 2001, however, she traded in her microphone for a chef’s knife, trained at the Le Cordon Bleu and worked at some of Atlanta’s finest restaurants. As she settled in the South, she also grew to love American-style ribs.

“I realized that it matched perfectly with galbi, my favorite Korean dish, and it became my favorite type of American food,” said Lee, known among her colleagues as JiJi.

Of course, as much as she enjoyed traditional Southern staples like ribs and brisket, she also realized ingredients from Korean cuisine could enhance the flavors. At Heirloom, ribs are steeped in a gochujang marinade for 24 hours, while dwaenjang soup, made from fermented soy beans, is injected into the menu’s beef brisket. Continue reading

Tuesday's Link Attack: News From The Peninsula

K-ola: Corruption in Korean pop music
The Economist (blog)

WITH its over-reliance on manufactured teen pop, and a leave-nothing-to-chance managerial style reminiscent of Phil Spector (minus the murder), there are obvious parallels between “K-Pop” and the American music industry of the 1950s and 60s. And perhaps now another box can be checked: the practice of bribing one’s way onto the charts. That’s payola, or 증회 in Korean.

Twenty-nine people, mainly radio and cable-TV staff, have been arrested on suspicion of accepting cash payments in return for airplay or fraudulent chart positions.

Yuna Kim named 8th highest paid female athlete
Korea Times

Forbes magazine announced that the Vancouver Olympic gold medalist earned about $10 million last year, to rank eighth while Russian tennis star Maria Sharapova maintained the top spot for a seventh consecutive year by earning $25 million.

The publication introduced Kim as the most popular athlete in Korea. It also mentioned that she has set up a sports management company to represent her. The company was responsible for staging ice show in Korea as well as in Los Angeles.

Korean Journalist Predicts Collapse of North Korea
Washington Times

The head of a leading news service covering North Korea is predicting that the ruling communist regime is headed for the dustbin of history — and soon.

“North Korea will collapse, of course, but the question is how long it might take,” Park In-ho, president of the Seoul-based Daily NK, told The Washington Times. “Within five years, 70 percent chance. But within 10 years? 100 percent.”

S. Korea Investigates Alleged North Korean Spy Ring
Voice of America

An alleged North Korean spying ring in South Korea is under investigation by prosecutors. It is the first such major espionage case in more than a decade and is sending shock waves through Seoul’s political establishment. Police have arrested five people and are questioning others, including opposition party and labor union officials.

Meet the brains behind the bunny ears
CNN Go

Rabito designer Mina Kwag has been causing a flurry online and offline with her cute and functional cell phone case designs.

US exports millions of chopsticks to China
The Telegraph (U.K.)

Georgia Chopsticks, based in the southern state of Georgia, is producing two million sets of the traditional eating utensils each day.

It is operating around the clock to keep up with demand and hopes to be exporting 10 million pairs a day by the end of the year, each set complete with a label marked “Made in USA.” Amid a shortage of wood in China the abundant poplar and sweet gum trees in Georgia were found to be ideal for chopsticks, producing straight, pliable and light coloured implements.

Jae Lee, a Korean-American who started the company, said: “When I opened this business the reaction from my friends and family was ‘Are you crazy?

Restaurant offers new take on Thai food
The State News (Mich.)

Ever since Jeffery Cho graduated from MSU, he’s waited for an opportunity to return to his college town.

Cho, fellow MSU alumni Brian Kim and Noerung Hang and Michigan graduate Victor Kim are the co-owners of No Thai! — a successful Thai restaurant with three locations in Ann Arbor — and have recently made the move to East Lansing.

The first No Thai! restaurant opened in September 2005, and the owners attribute their success and expansions to the great food they serve in a casual atmosphere.

LivingSocial buys South Korean deals site
AFP via Google News

Daily deals company LivingSocial announced on Tuesday that it is buying TicketMonster, the largest online bargains site in South Korea, in a bid to expand its presence in Asia.

South Korean Deluge
Boston.com

Check out this collection of photographs from South Korea’s recent floods and mudslides.

Amazing mudslide footage from taxi camera


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Chef Roy Choi Takes Reins At Venice Restaurant

Culinary star Roy Choi added another restaurant to his rapidly growing empire after being named head chef at the swanky Beechwood Kitchen in Venice, according to LA Weekly.

Choi replaced former Top Chef season 5 contestant Jamie Lauren, LA Weekly reported.

Chef Jamie Lauren is out and Choi is in at the sleek New American restaurant in Venice. Owner Dave Reiss has asked Choi to step in and “provide some new direction for the kitchen while making plans to renovate and update the dining space,” according to Alice Shin, Choi’s PR and Twitter maven. Get ready for Choi’s most American menu to date, one that’s “laid-back, beachy and contemporary, while expressing some of the classic idiosyncrasies of Roy’s imagination.”

Photo via WSJ.

North Korea-Run Eateries Spreading Across Asia

North Korea-owned restaurants are spreading across Asia and providing a much-needed source of income for the cash-strapped country, according to the Atlantic.

The magazine reported that the Pyongyang Cafe, which offers traditional Korean fare along with musical entertainment from hanbok-clad women, has carved out a niche in many popular tourist cities in the Far East and beyond.

North Korean government-run restaurants have existed for years in China, in regions adjacent to the [Democratic People's Republic of Korea]‘s northern border, but in the past decade the business has truly gone global.

In 2002, a branch of the Pyongyang restaurant chain opened in the Cambodian tourist hub of Siem Reap — the first outside China — and it became an immediate hit with South Korean tour groups visiting the nearby temples of Angkor.

Since 2003, the Atlantic reported, branches have opened in far-flung places such as Thailand, Laos, Indonesia, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Nepal and Dubai. Another branch is reportedly

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