Thursday’s Link Attack: Richard Park, North Korea, Snoop Dogg
Y. Peter Kang
Author: Y. Peter Kang
Posted: October 27th, 2011
Filed Under: BLOG
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Mayor Bloomberg Talks Kimchi In Queens
New York Daily News

After reminiscing about the years he traveled to Korea for business, enjoying good food and drink, Bloomberg took a series of questions ranging from immigration and restaurant inspections to language access and the paucity of Korean-American judges on the bench.

And since this is Queens, there was a complaint about parking.

But the first question at the Queens Library’s Flushing branch delved into the world of Korean food and restaurant inspections. The Mayor was told that Korean restaurant owners and small business owners feel they are treated unfairly and receive low grades.

Korean-American Voters Hear From District 37 Candidates
Patch.com (Teaneck, N.J.)

The Korean American Voters Council (KAVC) hosted a debate Tuesday for District 37 candidates at the Fort Lee Public Library following a forum the previous day with candidates for Bergen County office, in an effort to boost participation in the rapidly-growing Korean community.

The focus of both was on issues of particular concern to Korean-American voters, who tend to have a low turnout rate for elections, said moderator and KAVC staff attorney Chejin Park.

“The Korean population is really growing in Bergen County, but their participation is really low,” Park said. “The voter registration rate is less than 50 percent, and the participation rate—voter turnout—is less than 30 percent.”

Fairfax school board incumbent Ilryong Moon defends record
Washington Post

Critics have said the board doesn’t listen to parents and stubbornly defends Superintendent Jack D. Dale’s policies and decisions without asking tough questions.

Ilryong Moon, 54, the only at-large incumbent in the race, is one of the targets. In 2009, when the board voted 7 to 3 to extend Dale’s contract, Moon abstained. It was one of the most important votes of the last four years, and critics say Moon’s abstention showed a lack of leadership..

But Moon says he took a thoughtful and deliberative position, characteristics he says have defined his 12 years on the board. He says he abstained because he supported the contract renewal but disagreed with its four-year length — too long, in Moon’s eyes.

He says his institutional knowledge will be important for the school system’s stability as six other board incumbents retire, taking with them a combined 48 years of experience.

“I am very patient. I do not jump to conclusions and I am willing to consider all sides,” he said. “The next board needs to have someone with my background, experience and proven leadership.”

Weekes: Eight ‘non-stars’ impressing me
NHL.com

Richard Park, F, Pittsburgh Penguins — He’s always good. He’s just a good pro. How did the Islanders let a guy like that go? He’s versatile, cheap, a leader and a true pro. The Penguins value him and he’s a bargain at $550,000 on a two-way deal. They can play him on the third line, fourth line, power play, penalty kill. He’s a very skilled guy and a steal for Ray Shero.

North Korea bans citizens working in Libya from returning home
The Telegraph (U.K.)

North Korea has banned its own citizens working in Libya from returning home, apparently out of fear that they will reveal the extent – and final outcomes – of the revolutions that have shaken the Arab world.

Koreans in US eager to vote
Korea Times

Kim Bong-nam always thought voting was more a chore than a privilege. But not anymore — not since he moved to the U.S. and no longer had an official say in Korean politics.

“It’s funny how the sense of feeling deprived kicks in when you know you can’t do something,” says Kim, who left his hometown Incheon for New York just over a decade ago.

For Kim and some 2.7 million overseas Koreans, next spring is when the days of deprivation ends.

Starting with the general elections in April 2012, Korean nationals living abroad will be allowed to cast ballots, as part of a revised election law in 2009.

The new law grants voting rights to overseas residents aged 19 and older, as long as they still retain Korean citizenship.

Happy Makgeolli Day
Wall Street Journal

Makgeolli, the Korean rice liquor once derided as the drink of farmers and manual laborers, has seen a resurgence in popularity in recent years, as beloved by the generation of South Korean President Lee Myung-bak as it is by twenty- and thirtysomethings.

So much so that Mr. Lee’s government has dedicated a national day to the tipple. Makgeolli Day celebrates the fruit of Korean country life’s rise to prominence.

Kim Ng has the resume to be the Angels’ general manager
Los Angeles Times

After working in major league baseball in many capacities, including assistant general manager of the Dodgers, she is highly qualified to fill the vacant job in Anaheim.

Why the Next Steve Jobs Will be Asian
Inc.

As Washington maneuvers on skilled immigration reform, the United States is losing its near-monopoly on entrepreneurship by forcing its educated Indian and Chinese immigrants to return home.

Pan-Asian girl band looks to Snoop Dogg for help
Reuters

The pan-Asian “girl band” Blush has been around for only 11 months but already has a track record more established groups might envy — a single that hit number-three on the U.S. dance music charts and rapper Snoop Dogg in one of their songs.

This week, the English-singing group, whose members hail from Japan, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Korea and India, will open for the Black Eyed Peas at their Manila concert. They appeared at a Justin Bieber concert in Hong Kong earlier this year.

“The goal for Blush is to become really the first Asian singers to make it big in the West,” said John Niermann, a former president of Walt Disney Co’s Asia-Pacific unit, who brought the band together last year after a broad talent search.

Welcome to the world, little one
Korea Times

Here’s a nice first-person piece about bringing a child into the world in multicultural America.

I don’t usually write about my personal life in this space, but this time I will. I hope that you will forgive me. But it won’t be all personal, I promise. I will manage to work in some over-arching and redeeming social construct out of this somehow.

As I write, I am sitting in a birthing room in an ultra modern hospital with my wife in a bed over yonder hooked up with all types of tubes and monitors.

She’s eyeing me with an unfriendly “Really?” look on her face as I begin pecking on my laptop. I tell her that I want to make sure that this moment is recorded in writing for our baby to read when he grows up, so that he would know how much pain and effort she went through to give birth to him.

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