Tag Archives: youtube

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LINK ATTACK: Samsung’s Dark Secret, Psy Breaks YouTube, NKorea’s Name Ban

Samsung’s Devastating Secret: The Tears of ‘Semiconductor Children’
“In a new series, The Huffington Post Korea and its media partner, The Hankyoreh, report that long-term exposure to toxic chemicals may not only have lasting effects for some former Samsung workers, but also for their children.”

Dumbfoundead and the Year of the Metal Tiger
Critically acclaimed rapper James “Nocando” McCall writes about Koreatown rapper Dumbfounded, also known as Parker, and his rise to national fame during the year of the Metal Tiger.

Eat Your Kimchi Talks about Single Mothers in Korea

Rewriting the War, Japanese Right Attacks a Newspaper
“The Asahi Shimbun’s formal retraction of articles about ‘comfort women’ in World War II has led to an assault on the newspaper and on the view that Japan forced women into sexual slavery.” – The New York Times

Samsung Galaxy S6 Specs and Rumors
Here is an overview of what is already known about Saumsung’s forthcoming Galaxy S6 phone, based on leaks and rumors.

Eric Garner Case Resonates Among Asian Americans
“After a Staten Island grand jury decided to not indict white New York City police officer Daniel Pantaleo in the choke-hold death of Eric Garner, Asian American activists and academics have been issuing calls for shows of solidarity for the family and community of Garner.”

justiceforgarner01(Photo courtesy of Reuters)

Call for Papers: Third Annual Korea University Korean History Graduate Student Conference
The Korea University Korean History (KUKH) Graduate Student Conference invites graduate students from around the world and conducting research in Korean history to submit abstracts for its 2015 conference.

North Korea Has Room for Only One Jong-un
There can only be one Jong-un to rule them all. North Koreans are now banned from using their leader’s name, and those who share the same name will be forced to change it.

NORTHKOREA-master675(Photo courtesy of KCNA via Reuters)

Harvard Professor Now Honorary Citizen of Seoul
Harvard University professor and political philosopher Michael Sandel, who is incredibly popular in Korea for his books Justice & Citizens’ Rights in Seoul, was made an honorary citizen of Seoul on Friday.

Kim Kardashian May Not Have Broken the Internet, But Psy’s “Gangnam Style” Just Did
Earlier this week, Psy’s viral song “Gangnam Style” reached the maximum number of views on YouTube, forcing YouTube and Google to upgrade its view counter.

14 Major Events in the Korean Music Industry in 2014
The year of 2014 has been one of the most tumultuous years for the K-pop industry as it was hit with scandals, tragedies and law suits. Koreaboo and Korean media portal Osen have compiled 14 of the most significant events to have occurred this year.

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South Korean Unity Project Helps Kids Connect with Distant North
“Middle school students learn about differences in technology, food and lifestyles from North Korean defectors as part of reunification project.”

South Korea Tries Taxing Smoking into Oblivion
South Korea recently passed a new tax that doubles the average cost of cigarettes to 4,500 won ($4.05) in an effort to cut down on smoking.

Yoon Mi Rae, Tiger JK and Bizzy Release “Angel” Music Video

Featured photo courtesy of Yonhap.

 

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My Korean Husband: Exploring Interracial Relationships

by TAMMY TARNG

Complete with a YouTube channel, a comic series and blog posts, the website My Korean Husband, run by married couple Nichola and Hugh, documents the cultural differences and exploration of Korean and Australian culture. The site’s “About Us” page goes into further detail about the two:

“We are a married couple and we first met in Sydney, Australia. Nichola is an Australian woman and Hugh (Mr Gwon) is a Korean man. Nichola grew up in rural Australia, while Hugh grew up in rural South Korea. Growing up in very different cultures means there are many challenges to face, but there are also very many rewards.”

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The blog originally started as a creative space for Nichola’s comics to explore a wide range of issues. In the comics, the couple is portrayed as a bickering, but affectionate couple who explore Korean culture together. The adorable comics focus on everything from lack of oven mitts to the difference between Korean and Australian food.

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And in regards to communication, Nichola says, “I think all couples, even those that speak the same native language, can have this problem. We just tend to more aware of it. We are patient with each other, and don’t jump to conclusions and we ask for clarification before reacting to something. While we don’t speak the same native language, we speak the same language emotionally so we rarely have problems with communication.”

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“We’re comparing and contrasting our lives as cartoonists, English teachers, fathers and husbands,” the couple told the Korea Herald in 2013. “We’re also going to bring in guest cartoonists with connections to Korea and Japan and maybe try to open a dialogue between a few Korean and Japanese cartoonists.”

Dating someone of a different culture may be difficult at times, but as this couple proves, it has a handful of rewards along the way.

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Photos courtesy of mykoreanhusband.com 

Originally published on Audrey Magazine

Horror

[VIDEO] What Terrifies Young People on Halloween

by JAMES S. KIM

Once upon a time, having a fear of the dark usually meant being afraid of what the darkness concealed. What could be lurking in the shadows? The more we try to not think about it, the more it creeps into our minds.

Of course, these days we don’t need torches and kindling. We have our smartphones with their brilliant AMOLED screens that we bury our faces in during every spare waking moment. That is, until the battery runs out, the Wi-fi signal blinks out, the data connection slows to  a crawl, and, worst of all, the reception dies.

There are many of us who lived in the dark times before the age of the smartphone when our main sources of light came from the sun and light bulbs, so we know not to panic in those situations. AT&T throttling our data? We can deal with it. But there are many young people who can’t. Those who see the world through hashtags, likes and low-res selfies are blind when those are taken away from them.

Paul Gale Comedy’s video “Millenial Horror Story” looks at what terrifies twenty-somethings on Halloween. Directed by T.J. Misny and produced by Jay Parks, a Korean American film producer, the video is shot cleverly all in one take in a haunted house. Of course, the house isn’t really the scariest thing about the video. It’s how eerily accurate its portrayal of young people could be.

Watch the video below:

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NKorea In World Cup Final, Says Fake News Clip That Further Distorts Public View Of Country

by TONY KIM

On Saturday, YouTube channel Korea News Backup posted what appeared to be a North Korean news clip of its national team advancing to the World Cup finals to face Portugal. Several news sites even initially reported that the video is an official North Korean state broadcast. The absurdity of the content (um, North Korea didn’t qualify for this year’s tournament), coupled with the public’s oh-those-crazy-North-Koreans view, was enough to make the video go viral. So far, it’s generated more than 5 million views.

In the clip, a female anchor takes viewers through North Korea’s historic run in the tournament. Apparently, the national team first advanced out of the group stage as the number one seed after beating China 2:0. Conveniently, North Korea then goes on to blow out the U.S. and Japan to finally face Portugal. Edited footage of Brazilian fans cheering for North Korea’s victory and its supreme leader, Kim Jong-un, was also shown.

Though we can’t confirm 100-percent, it’s very, very likely that the segment is fake.

Yahoo Sports points out that the anchor’s dialect is wrong and her voice is not in synch with her lips. More convincingly, The Telegraph reported around a month ago that North Korean citizens are actually able to watch the World Cup games, even though some games may be shown after a 24-hour delay. In its report, one North Korean viewer comments that although North Korea did not qualify, he was curious to see other national teams play.

Of course, such details don’t quite fit the simplistic narrative of North Korea as a “hermit kingdom.” With such a lack of information coming out of the closed society, even the most bizarre stories are often reported at face value.

 

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Malaysian Girl Sings About Not Being Korean In Viral Video

by MICHELLE WOO

“Please stop saying ‘anyong-anyong haseyo.’ Please stop saying ‘kamsahamni—what?'” 

In a music video that’s already raked in more than 2 million views, Malaysian YouTube darling Joyce Chu sings about what it’s like when everyone assumes you’re Korean when you’re not.

The fresh-faced, ukelele-playing 17-year-old, who lives in Johor Bahru (often called JB) in southern Malaysia, bemoans getting hit on by Korean dudes (“I beg you, oppa, oppa, oppa, stop bothering me”) and the fact that people think she’s had plastic surgery (“I know you’re actually criticizing me about my face, nose chin, eyes and dimples”).  She believes that “Korean dramas are fake so stop being crazy about [them].” Oh no, she did-n’t. 

Chu does love kimchi and K-pop—she’s done covers of Crayon Pop and her “idol” 2NE1. She just wants to proclaim that she’s a “Malaysia Chabor” (woman)—and proud of it. Fair enough.

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‘Bad Rap’ Documentary Asks: Where Are The Asian American Rappers?

by JAMES S. KIM

Ever since hip-hop took off in the South Bronx in the 1970s, rappers around the world have embraced the music and culture, with many carving out their own identities and establishing themselves as mainstream stars.

But what about Asian American rappers? Though several have stomped onto the scene, from pioneers such as the Mountain Brothers, Jin and Lyrics Born, to stars of today including Far East Movement and Jay Park, these aren’t the names that we immediately associate with hip-hop in mainstream American culture.

Why not? Is it a lack of support? Their appearance? Not having that breakout hit? Filmmakers Salima Koroma (director/producer) and Jaeki Cho (producer) are looking to explore that question with Bad Rap, a new documentary about the Asian American presence in hip hop.

 

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Bad Rap focuses on the perspectives of four Asian American rappers: Dumbfoundead, Awkwafina, Rekstizzy and Lyricks. Each has their own story, style and attitude, but they all share the same goal: to make it big. Yet they all encounter challenges in a culture that still expects them to fit the model minority stereotype.

With insight and appearances from Far East Movement, Jay Park, Jin, Traphik, Decipher, Kero One, The Fung Bros, Ted Chung and Oliver Wang, Bad Rap looks to shed light on the Asian American hip-hop culture and highlight the up-and-coming stars.

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Salima Koroma (left) and Jaeki Cho

As of now, Koroma and Cho are looking to add on their 40-minute film, and they are asking for support via Indiegogo. All proceeds will go towards adding more content to complete a 70-minute feature, as well as finalizing the film for its eventual premiere.

The idea for Bad Rap began with a “mutual obsession” with hip-hop. Koroma first reached out to Cho, who had written a piece on K-pop star G-Dragon when she was searching for a subject to cover for her thesis at Columbia University. Cho’s journey with hip-hop began with listening to Drunken Tiger when he was 10 years old, and that led to a career in music journalism.

Check out the trailer below, and follow the project on their Indiegogo page, as well as on Facebook, TwitterInstagram and YouTube.

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Traphik (Timothy DeLaGhetto)

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Jay Park

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Far East Movement

Images via Bad Rap Film Indiegogo Page

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This Dancing Baby Makes Everything OK In The World

Not much is known about the YouTube video titled “What a dance by a chubby Korean baby!” that’s quickly storming through the internet. What we do know is that when we watch it, all is OK in the world.

The adorably squishable toddler, who’s being compared to Psy, teaches us that sometimes, you just need to take off your pants, step onto a TV stand and dance.

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#IAm Campaign Celebrates AAPI Heritage Month With Star Power

In support of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (AAPIHM), the Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment (CAPE) will be launching its #IAm Campaign, a celebration of Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) role models in the arts and entertainment. The all-digital campaign is the first of its kind, and it features some of the world’s biggest Asian stars on film, television and YouTube.

“My job at CAPE is simple: to put more Asian faces in front of and behind the camera through events, education, and advocacy,” said executive director Jennifer Sanderson. “We are change agents for our community and the entertainment industry, but we still have a long way to go to overcome the false stereotypes and misrepresentations that plague us. That’s where the CAPE #IAm Campaign comes in. “The goal is to share stories, who we really are, instead of perpetuating stereotypes that are ever present in the mainstream media.”

The #IAm Campaign begins today with two web releases: a fun eight-episode web series, “Making I AM: Get me Your Friends,” and a set of 19 mini-documentaries featuring AAPI artists and leaders telling their stories of overcoming obstacles and chasing dreams.

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The eight-episode series follows actor (and KoreAm columnist) Randall Park as he becomes the “Nick Fury” for CAPE’s campaign. Tasked with assembling an all-star group of Asian American artists and role models, Park relentlessly pursues that goal—sometimes resorting to drastic measures.

In order to recruit The Walking Dead’s Steven Yeun, Park agrees to set him up on a date with model Jessica Gomes. As Yeun finds out, however, he’s not the only one who fell for that false promise. Park also somehow out-dances Harry Shum Jr. in a dance-off to get him to join, although Dancing With The Stars judge Carrie Ann Inaba might have been a tad generous with her score.

YouTube stars Michelle Phan, Ryan Higa and Wong Fu Productions also make appearances alongside actors and actresses Brian Tee, Leonardo Nam, Amy Hill, Bobby Lee, Melissa Tang and Kelly Hu. Journalist Lisa Ling and Master Chef Christine Ha join in as well. You can check out the videos onCAPE’s YouTube channel and on the #IAm Campaign website.

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