Wednesday’s Link Attack: Beef Imports Halted, Kim Jong Un, Marion Barry
Y. Peter Kang
Author: Y. Peter Kang
Posted: April 25th, 2012
Filed Under: BLOG
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South Korea Halts Customs Clearance of U.S. Beef
Bloomberg

South Korea will halt customs clearance of U.S. beef imports after the first U.S. case of mad cow disease in six years was found in a dairy cow in central California, an agriculture ministry official said.

The government will release details of inspections “soon,” Park Sang Ho, an official at South Korea’s agricultural ministry, said by phone. The agriculture office shortly after issued a statement saying it will take the “necessary measures.”

‘My family was victimized’: Perspectives on the riots, 20 years later
Southern California Public Radio

Four journalists facilitated the discussions, which were broken down by ethnicity: a panel of black Angelenos, a panel of Latinos, a panel of Korean Americans and one simply dubbed “other.” The resulting conversations were eye-opening. Panelists shared not only their recollections, but how they interpreted the legacy of these traumatic few days long ago, and how the riots have helped shaped the city since, for better or worse.

Making Fun of Kim Jong Un Is Distracting Us from Human-Rights Abuses
Time

Yukking it up about North Korea has become an American and European pastime. Until his death, Kim Jong Il’s silly jumpsuits, puffy hair and big glasses were an easy laugh on Jon Stewart’s Daily Show. Similarly, editors and reporters at the Economist made fun of the “extraterrestrial freaks” who rule North Korea. That magazine conceded in April that mockery had numbed its moral outrage. “It is easier to lampoon the regime,” an editorial said, “than to grapple with the suffering it inflicts.”

The scale of that suffering is increasingly less amusing. A second edition of Hidden Gulag, a report by David Hawk of the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea, stitches together ghastly eyewitness accounts from 60 North Koreans sent to camps for wrongdoing, wrong thinking or having the wrong relatives. Their stories are linked to annotated satellite images showing a string of sprawling labor camps that contain 150,000 to 200,000 prisoners.

D.C.’s Marion Barry called ‘racist’ for remark about Filipino nurses
Washington Post

For the second time in less than a month, D.C. Council member Marion Barry is having to fend off criticism that he unfairly singled out an ethnic group as he attempted to explain how to get more African Americans trained and employed in the District.

At a hearing Monday on the University of the District of Columbia’s budget, he spoke about the need to train more African Americans to become nurses. In a video of his remarks aired by WTTG-TV, Barry noted a growing number of nurses are “immigrants” from the Philippines.

Sunny Kang Sees Dark Days After Huntington Beach Cop Car Slams into Her Ride
OC Weekly

A Huntington Beach woman who says a police officer ran a red light and smashed into her car has filed a claim seeking an unspecified payout from her city. Filed March 30, Sunny Kang’s claim is perceived to be the first step before a lawsuit seeking more than $25,000 in filed in Superior Court.

Itaewon gay bar once hidden, now on surface
Korea Times

Korean gay culture sprouted from this hill; the bars and clubs have played a role as a rendezvous among gay people. Always Homme is one of them, known as the oldest gay bar in town. A group of girls were first in the place, as regulars, asking how the bartenders were doing. They kissed each other on the cheek and ordered Margaritas.

Koreans Shop for Bigger Bottoms
Chosun Ilbo

Fashion-conscious Koreans are spending more money to improve their posterior. Padded underwear and girdles making bottoms look firmer are selling well, as do blue jeans, pantyhose and leggings with padded posteriors. The trend comes from the popularity of skinny jeans, miniskirts and other body-hugging clothes that focus on slim waistlines and voluminous behinds.

Korean cosmetics company to release world’s first refrigerated cosmetics-Frostine
Korea.net

LG will be introducing the world’s first ‘refrigerated’ skincare line called FROSTINE. The brand will be free from harmful substances and no need to worry about parabens, phenoxyethanol because the line will contain no preservatives and will completely rely on the temperature for product stabilization.

Dennis Choi Discusses Neuroscience, Diseases of The Brain and How The Mind Emerges
Big Think via YouTube

Dennis Choi, director of Emory University’s Neuroscience Center, is renowned for his groundbreaking research on brain and spinal cord injuries.

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